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Commissioners vote to allow Stewart's posters in courthouse

The Johnson County commissioners quickly convened into an executive session after the opening of the March County Commissioners meeting.  The commissioners, who met with Nate Kellum of the Alliance Defense Fund, returned to the courtroom after a meeting that lasted approximately one hour regarding the Ten Commandment lawsuit filed against Johnson County by Ralph Stewart.  The lawsuit was filed when the county would not allow specific posters, proposed by Stewart, to be displayed in the county courthouse.  A motion was made and approved unanimously to allow Stewart’s documents to be displayed in the county courthouse.
Morris Woodring, Superintendent of Johnson County Schools, asked  for the support of the commissioners with regard to a Safe Walk to School grant.  If awarded, these monies would be used to build a walkway from both the high school and the middle school out to the state road, along with expansion of the high school bridge.  
Road Superintendent Tony Jennings requested the county commissioners  change the name of Ed Potter Road, near the intersection of Route 421 and Forge Creek Road, back to Prison Camp Road.  The motion was approved.  Jennings also asked for permission to sell surplus equipment on www.govdeals.com, indicating the items for sale were in worn-down condition.   Jennings added that five to six items at a time are listed.  The department will also place an ad in the newspapers.  “Anyone that wants to bid on it can,” Jennings said.  
B.C. Stout, property assessor for Johnson County, came forward to ask the commissioners for their approval of the property reappraisal plan.  

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