October 24, 2018

 Dear Editor,

We American people were not served well by Judge Kavanaugh’s hurried confirmation process and the FBI investigation constrained by limits on time and witnesses. Christine Ford says Kavanaugh pushed her down on a bed and tried to remove her clothes when she was 15 and he 17 and drunk.  She is probably telling the truth, as the memory of such an assault is seared into one’s indelibly.  He says he doesn’t remember the incident.
He is probably telling the truth too, having been unable to imprint the memory in his brain due to an alcoholic blackout.

Her story is not unusual or unique.  As a physician, I hear similar stories almost every day at work.  Women tell of being molested as children or raped as teens and adults and not reporting the attacks because they felt scared and helpless and were afraid they would not believe or taken seriously, then holding in their feelings of shame and worthlessness and having difficulties in trusting others and problems in their intimate relationships.

Some tell their stories years later to a physician or a therapist with whom they feel safe, as did Ms. Ford several years ago. Subsequently, upon Kavanaugh’s nomination to become a Supreme Court justice, Ms. Ford felt it her civic duty to tell the Senate about this part of his personality and character. Appointments to the highest court in our land should be given to men and women of exemplary character and the highest ethical standards.  The FBI should have been allowed to do a thorough investigation before the Senate voted on Kavanaugh’s appointment, and his rage and partisan comments should have disqualified him for the position.  The Senate failed in their responsibility to us, the American people.

Thank you for considering my viewpoint.
Neal Sanders, M.D.