By Tamas Mondovics

Millions will be taking a moment out of their busy lives next Monday to pause and reflect on the ground they are standing.
And, for a good reason.
For nearly a half a century on April 22, people around the world have been celebrating Earth Day as the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement in 1970, when people took to the streets to protest the negative impacts of 150 years of industrial development.
According to Earth Day Network (EDN) president, Kathleen Rogers, in the U.S. and around the world, smog was becoming deadly, and evidence was growing that pollution led to developmental delays in children. Biodiversity was in decline as a result of the heavy use of pesticides and other pollutants.
Rogers stated that the global ecological awareness was growing, and the US Congress, leading to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, and robust environmental laws such as the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act, among many.
“Earth Day is now a global event each year, and we believe that more than one billion people in 192 countries now take part in what is the largest civic-focused day of action in the world,” Rogers said.
This years’ celebration under its fitting title “Earth Day 2019 – Protect Our Species” will once again promising to draw attention to the challenges facing the planet and the effort to save it.
EDN is now is asking all to join its “Protect our Species” campaign, while pursuing several goals, such as education, raise awareness about the accelerating rate of extinction of millions of species and the causes and consequences of this phenomenon.
EDN hopes to achieve major policy victories that protect broad groups of species as well as individual species and their habitats while building and activate a global movement that embraces nature and its values.
EDN also encourages individual actions such as adopting a plant-based diet and stopping pesticide and herbicide use.
While 2018 focused on “End Plastic Pollution” as its theme, officials are already making big plans for 2020, the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.
Earth Day representatives emphasized that April 22, is a day of political action and civic participation with people marching, signing petitions, and meeting with their elected officials.
Many will plant trees, clean up their towns and roads, while corporations and governments use it to make pledges and announce sustainability measures, and faith leaders, adding their input in the hope of protecting God’s greatest creations, humans, biodiversity and the planet.
For more information, please visit www.earthday.org.