Letter to the Editor: Kudos

Thank you for the article in the Tomahawk this week on Imagination Library! I also loved the picture  of Jessica reading to her  little boy. Marlana, you did an excellent job of covering the facts of this program and the importance of parents reading to their children. Tamas, I appreciate your ongoing support of our program and literacy. Thank you for making a positive difference in the lives of our children.

Blessings!
Betty

A Letter from the Editor: Shame on you

To start with, the staff at the Tomahawk Newspaper would like to express the opening phrase of just three simple words to the person(s) responsible for stealing several flowerpots, which had been beautifying the little garden leading up to the back entrance of the newsroom. A little secret, here at the Tomahawk that we enjoy during each spring and summer is that our Publisher, Bill Thomas, willingly puts his gardening talent to good use by means of creating a visibly tasteful, flower bed and garden, coupled with a variety of color-filled flowerpots, that are skillfully arranged by the back door and around the garden.

As soon as the weather breaks each year, Bill goes to work, wasting no time to get his garden ready for the season, all to ensure that work each morning starts with a visually satisfying and enjoyable fruit of his green-thumbed labor of love. And, it is indeed beautiful. The garden is always balanced and is growing, often prompting Bill to share some of the plants and flowers with the staff.

To some, this incident may not be such a big deal and, perhaps monetarily, it really is not. But to us here at the newsroom and most importantly to Bill, our pretty little garden’s creator it means more than a few words from this editor can express.

By the way, we do have surveillance cameras in place just in case you all wondering. So, to the shameless thief of our flowerpots—aside from our
utmost disappointment of finding our garden robbed of some of its beauty—we close with another three-word phrase, “Please enjoy it.”

Letters to the Editor: Kudos

Dear Editor,
Just wanted to say good job on the part of John Robinson for his 7/5/18 letter “Tough decisions have to be made by all.”
I can’t vouch for the truth or accuracy of anything he wrote, but I do praise him for raising actual issues instead of recycling the typical drivel about how long the candidates have lived in Johnson County, how much they love Johnson County, who their parents and grandparents are, which church they attend, etc.

Terry Wintroub

Letters to the Editor: Thank you

Dear Editor,
We moved to East Tennessee two years ago from the ‘flatlands’ near Raleigh NC. The natural beauty and cooler temperatures of the Johnson County area were a big draw for us, as I believe they are for many newcomers.
The beautiful mountain trails, cool, clean creeks, wildflowers and abundant wildlife are irreplaceable resources that should not be taken for granted by anyone, ever, not native locals or recent residents. And while we came here to be closer to family and have a better view, we have since discovered another natural resource that’s equally valuable; the people of Johnson County, TN.

You are welcoming, hospitable and your kindness has meant a lot to us. Thank you for making this place feel like home. One resident, in particular, has been especially helpful, Mayor Larry Potter. When we realized we’d need help with our litter pick-up efforts, I made many phone calls to any and every local authority I could think of and ended up on the phone with Mayor Potter. He was helpful and frank about the littering problem here and made us feel less hopeless about the issue. Since that phone call, I’ve had the pleasure of meeting Mayor Potter in person at a variety of events from fund-raising spaghetti suppers to small business owner meetings. He was there, listening, lending his support and basically doing his job.

I meant to call him again recently to say thank you for all of the litter clean-up efforts we have seen in our neck of the woods. It didn’t seem right to call and complain and then not call back when things got better, but I reckon “Larry” is used to that. Remember to vote.

Jeana Taylor

Letters to the editor: Tough decisions response

TO THE EDITOR
In response to John Robinson’s “Tough decisions have to be made by all”

I offer the following.
First, I addressed the same issues Mr. Robinson addressed in his letter several years ago, but to no avail. We still have as many commissioners, as years past, which is five too many. I guess the $100.00 + dollars they make each month for so little work justify their membership in the good ‘ol boy network.I have met my commissioner, Bill Adams, once about five years (we have lived in beautiful mountain city for ten years now) when he was running for office and have not heard or seen him since.

We need less taxes such as the wheel tax, property tax increases and more, if more is required, then either a general sales tax for a limited time, i.e. two years. Vote to allow beer and wine sales in the city and county. Those that do drink beer and wine must spend the money out of town thereby mountain city losing valuable tax dollars.
Without more good restaurants being able to offer wine and/or beer to their customers with a good meal mountain city will be known as the fast food capital of Johnson County. We need to move out of the 19th century and into the 21st century.

There is as definite lack of communication between the commissioners and their constituents. Perhaps they could obtain e-mail addresses or simple a newsletter when they could then offer their constituents what will be voted upon and receive feedback and then vote how the constituents feel they should and not on their personal agenda. Results could then be printed in The Tomahawk for everyone to see and constituents could then contact the commissioner of their concerns. Additionally, there should be term limitations to commissioner’s office which will allow for fresh ideas from new members of the community and not those set in their ways. I suggest two – three terms with one third of the commissioners being replaced at a time.

I realize there is a commissioners meeting monthly and constituents could voice their concerns however, there is a time limitation on speaking and how many constituents can you fit in the hearing room and listen to their concerns for all the commissioners? Concluding I predict that nothing will change and our taxes will continue to go up without looking for alternative options.

George Spreyne

Letters to the editor: Liberal “clap trap”

Dear Editor,
More liberal clap trap on the opinion pages of the Tomahawk in the “Institutionalized Cruelty” article. No one is separating “immigrant” families. Rather criminals are being separated from their children just like they are every day as folks are taken to jail for breaking the law.

These people choose to come here illegally and break our immigration laws and need to be held accountable. Liberals want you to believe this sprang up after Trump was elected – wrong the practice has been in place for a decade.
Just like civil war memorials which have been around for 100 plus years liberals have awoken to suddenly be offended.
It is time for our country’s laws to be vigorously enforced. Try entering Mexico illegally and see what happens – you won’t get housing, education, medical care and food stamps – you will be imprisoned. Enough with the propaganda!

Deborah Roush

Letters to the editor: Thank you

Dear editor,
I wanted to write you and say thank you. I have been a long time lover of our local paper, but over the last few years I could notice it was going “down hill” per say.

However, over the past few months the stories and topics have been outstanding and exactly what a local paper should incorporate. I’ve debated about even mentioning this but you can take it or leave it and I’ll understand. The past few articles about people in our community really began to make me appreciate our town, the people in it and the impacts they are leaving in it.

But after all this individual has done for this entire community I feel that it shouldn’t go unnoticed, and readers that already know this man would be intrigued to see everything he is apart of Mr. Chase McGlamery graduated from JCHS this last May, but with in his four years there he completed over 1,600 community service hours in our county alone. He served as the student School member, continues to serve as a Heritage Hall board member, community theatre board member. He somehow found time to do all of that and balance working at high school sporting events, volunteering regularly at his church and keeping straight A’s.

There are so many people in this county this young man has touched by his willingness to assist in anyway possible. While this young man may not be the star player on a sports team, he is a star in our community who is respected for his golden heart to serve his community. There are so many people who love to hear about the amazing good their neighbors are doing without anything in return. It’s people like Mr. McGlamery that makes Johnson County a great place to live. Thank you for your time and dedication to our community.

Respectfully, 
Joan W.

Budget woes a voter’s concern

Dear Editor and Johnson County Voters

As the current President of The Republican Women Of Johnson County I have been asked repeatedly about the local elections, whom should folks vote for this office or that office.
I, of course, cannot tell anyone whom to vote for as it is against our by-laws.
But one race (Sheriff’s race) in particular has gotten a lot of attention. I do have opinions on the job as Sheriff. I have heard the candidates and for the most part they are sincere about wanting to improve the Johnson County Sheriff’s office.
I have talked to Mike Reece and others about the problems he experiences every day keeping this County safe. He has a budget that only allows a certain amount of dollars for each department.
People complain to me about the drug problem in the County, and I now understand the reason why his budget only allows the Sheriff to have one officer for a drug task force. We need at least two. But there is no money available for more.
Another very serious issue is school safety. Are the voters aware that we have only one full time resource officer for all of the schools except the high school? The School Board pays for the high school officer, if my information is correct. The budget again has no money for additional officers.
I can go department by department and explain why we have shortfalls. It all boils down to how much money is granted for the Sheriff’s work.
The simple truth is, they need more funds to do the job, we as taxpayers and citizens expect our city to be safe, our schools to be safe, but are you wiling to pay a little more in taxes for it?
The fact is that our Sheriff’ is protecting the county on a shoestring budget. We as taxpayers need to ask our county commissioners how they feel about raising taxes or finding other creative ways to grant the Sheriff more funds to do the job.
Now, one other question I have been asked is “How do you feel about the Court House Security?
Well this is just my opinion but I would rather see Judges, Lawyers, office staff, and elected officials carrying a gun to work than an elementary school teacher carrying a gun to class.
Fact: There have been 30 school gun related incidents in 2018 alone in the US; I do not have data on courthouse incidents.
So to sum it up I vote for the candidate of choice but know that whoever is elected he will need the proper tools to work with and the funds necessary to do a good job.
These are just my thoughts and I hope that this letter helps you to make the best choice for our beloved county.

Gwen Bell

“Tough decisions have to be made by all.”

Dear Editor,

I would like to share my thoughts and opinion on the upcoming election.
Ask the candidates how they voted previously.
Most commissioners voted against Sunday beer sales but quickly supported raising the wheel tax and property tax to increase revenue.
Vote to raise the sales tax-everyone needs to share the burden; the reduction of taxes on groceries sounded good but meant fewer dollars in our budget.
The school board also needs to tighten their belt. Ask them how they can justify keeping Shady Valley Elementary School open, or adding air-conditioning; they cannot do it by dollars and cents.
Tough decisions have to be made by all. Fewer commissioners with better qualifications and accountability are a start.
How about more coverage on who and how they voted on an issue, or better yet, broadcast it on the radio or on the internet as other counties do.
Thank you for listening and allow sharing my thoughts.

John Robinson

This Is How Net Neutrality Ends

Dear Editor,

On June 11, net neutrality protections ceased to exist. This means your internet service provider is now able to engage in content based discrimination. Internet content it likes — for political or financial reasons — can be delivered at top speeds, while content it disfavors can be slowed or even blocked.
But did that start happening on day one? No, because the big telecoms that fought so hard to kill net neutrality are smarter than that.
Internet service providers spent millions of dollars lobbying the Federal Communications Commission to end net neutrality, and they are certainly going to expect a healthy return on that investment. While the ISPs are clearly focused on increasing their profits, here the ISPs are likely to be patient. Their wisest course of action will be to eliminate net neutrality like a slow drip over time in the hope that consumers won’t notice and will stop caring.
The big telecoms know that bipartisan legislation to reject the FCC’s abandonment of net neutrality is pending before the House, after being approved by the Senate last month. They know that 86 percent of all Americans favor restoring the FCC’s net neutrality rules. And they know that three state legislatures and six state governors have already adopted [5] pro-net neutrality measures and that many more are considering joining their ranks.
Given this environment, the ISPs are unlikely to engage in visible, net neutrality violating behavior right away.
Shortly after casting his vote in favor of the Senate bill to preserve net neutrality, Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) said, “If you trust your cable company, you’re not going to like
my vote today. If you don’t trust your cable company, you will.”
Kennedy’s analysis is certainly correct, but his comments also hint at what likely is the next step in the ISPs’ net neutrality playbook: When June 11 came and went, we expected that the ISPs would do little to nothing in response.
After some time has passed, we expect them to point to their inaction as proof
we were wrong to distrust them and their promises not to violate net neutrality in the absence of a federal mandate. And guess what
will happen next? Drip. Drip. Drip. And before we know it, a flood will have washed away the free and open internet we all rely on.
So yes, net neutrality ended on June 11. When we will first feel the impact of that loss is unknown, but what is known is that the fight is far from over.
To bring net neutrality protections back, call your member of Congress and insist they vote to join the Senate’s
effort under the Congressional Review Act to save net neutrality. For extra effect, when you talk to your member of
Congress, be certain to mention that net neutrality will be on your mind when you go to the polls in November.
Although we may have lost net neutrality in the
short run, if the 82 percent of Republicans, 90 percent of Democrats, and 85 percent of independents who favor net
neutrality make their voices heard, there is no doubt
we will win in the end.

Chad Marlow, Advocacy and Policy Counsel, ACLU

A “thank you” to those supporting Good Neighbor Award recipients

Dear Editor

On behalf of Delta Kappa Gamma International Dear Editor:
On behalf of Delta Kappa Gamma International and its Johnson County chapter, Gamma Mu, I wish to thank those who generously donated to the contents of the “Goodie Bags” that were presented to the recipients of The Good Neighbor Award at a reception in their honor May 1, 2018.
Gift cards were donated by Bizzies, Little Caesar’s, McDonald’s, Burger King and Hardees. Elizabethton Federal, Farmer’s State Bank, Johnson County Bank and Mountain Electric also contributed.
To all of these generous business establishments, THANK YOU for helping us recognize and affirm the five Middle School students who were named Good Neighbors for consistently demonstrating the qualities we want in our neighbors: compassion, kindness, and generosity.
In addition to local support, the students were especially honored by Rep. Timothy Hill, who presented each one with a Proclamation which had been read on the floor of the Tennessee House of Representatives in their honor, and Sen. Jon Lundberg sent to each student a flag that had been flown on the Capitol Building in Nashville in their honor. Dr. Phil Roe, our representative in the United States House of Representative, sent a personal note
of congratulations to each Good Neighbor as well. Their support of our students means a great deal!

Sheila Cruse
Chair, Educational Excellence Committee
DKG/Gamma Mu

Letters to the Editor: Net neutrality

Dear Editor,

On June 11, net neutrality protections ceased to exist. This means your internet service provider is now able to engage in content based discrimination. Internet content it likes — for political or financial reasons — can be delivered at top speeds, while content it disfavors can be slowed or even blocked.

But did that start happening on day one? No, because the big telecoms that fought so hard to kill net neutrality are smarter than that.
Internet service providers spent millions of dollars lobbying the Federal Communications Commission to end net neutrality, and they are certainly going to expect a healthy return on that investment. While the ISPs are clearly focused on increasing their profits, here the ISPs are likely to be patient. Their wisest course of action will be to eliminate net neutrality like a slow drip over time in the hope that consumers won’t notice and will stop caring.

The big telecoms know that bipartisan legislation to reject the FCC’s abandonment of net neutrality is pending before the House, after being approved by the Senate last month. They know that 86 percent of all Americans favor restoring the FCC’s net neutrality rules. And they know that three state legislatures and six state governors have already adopted [5] pro-net neutrality measures and that many more are considering joining their ranks.

Given this environment, the ISPs are unlikely to engage in visible, net neutrality violating behavior right away. Shortly after casting his vote in favor of the Senate bill to preserve net neutrality, Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) said, “If you trust your cable company, you’re not going to like  my vote today. If you don’t trust your cable company, you will.”

Kennedy’s analysis is certainly correct, but his comments also hint at what likely is the next step in the ISPs’ net neutrality playbook: When June 11 came and went, we expected that the ISPs would do little to nothing in response.  After some time has passed, we expect them to point to their inaction as proof  we were wrong to distrust them and their promises not to violate net neutrality in the absence of a federal mandate. And guess what will happen next? Drip. Drip. Drip. And before we know it, a flood will have washed away the free and open internet we all rely on.

So yes, net neutrality ended on June 11. When we will first feel the impact of that loss is unknown, but what is known is that the fight is far from over. To bring net neutrality protections back, call your member of Congress and insist they vote to join the Senate’s
effort under the Congressional Review Act to save net neutrality. For extra effect, when you talk to your member of Congress, be certain to mention that net neutrality will be on your mind when you go to the polls in November.

Although we may have lost net neutrality in the short run, if the 82 percent of Republicans, 90 percent of Democrats, and 85 percent of independents who favor net neutrality make their voices heard, there is no doubt we will win in the end.

Chad Marlow, Advocacy and Policy Counsel, ACLU

Letters to the Editor: Good Neighbor Award

A “thank you” to those supporting Good Neighbor Award recipients

Dear Editor,

On behalf of Delta Kappa Gamma International and its Johnson County chapter, Gamma Mu, I wish to thank those who generously donated to the contents of the “Goodie Bags” that were presented to the recipients of The Good Neighbor Award at a reception in their honor May 1, 2018.Gift cards were donated by Bizzies, Little Caesar’s, McDonald’s, Burger King and Hardees. Elizabethton Federal, Farmer’s State Bank, Johnson County Bank and Mountain Electric also contributed.

To all of these generous business establishments, THANK YOU for helping us recognize and affirm the five Middle School students who were named Good Neighbors for consistently demonstrating the qualities we want in our neighbors: compassion, kindness, and generosity.

In addition to local support, the students were especially honored by Rep. Timothy Hill, who presented each one with a Proclamation which had been read on the floor of the Tennessee House of Representatives in their honor, and Sen. Jon Lundberg sent to each student a flag that had been flown on the Capitol Building in Nashville in their honor. Dr. Phil Roe, our representative in the United States House of Representative, sent a personal note of congratulations to each Good Neighbor as well. Their support of our students means a great deal!

Sheila Cruse
Chair, Educational Excellence Committee
DKG/Gamma Mu

Letters to the editor: Roe’s message confuses supporter

Dear Editor
Yesterday, I attended a golf social hosted by the Sullivan County Young Republicans that Congressman Phil Roe attended and spoke at. I came to the event respecting Congressman Roe for his contributions to my district, but I left the event perplexed. In his speech and comments to people, Congressman Roe persistently associated himself with President Trump’s agenda and successes; however, Congressman Roe also told the audience that “he [Donald Trump] wasn’t my first, second, or third choice” for the Republican nomination. How silly is it that Roe is so opportunistic that he associates himself with the President while also stating that he would have preferred so many others before Trump? I hope that in the future our leaders are more authentic and less focused on riding on the coattails of politicians.

Bryson Marshall

Letter to the editor: Condoms are not the answer

Dear Editor:
Condoms are not of sufficient strength to guarantee that they will not break. A good comparative experiment shows that 60 percent of condoms do not maintain global standards of safety. It was assured by an investigation conducted in the program “Strengthening consumer organizations of Latin America and the Caribbean in the process of normalization”, released by Consumers International and reaffirmed by the International Research and Testing in UK and the Consumers Union of United States group.
It has been proven worldwide that condoms are not the answer, said 150 experts from 36 countries at the Center for Infectious Disease Control in Atlanta, researchers at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, medical experts from the universities of Maastricht, Zurich and the Sorbonne and members of the Academy of Medicine of France.

Gabriel Roselló

Letters to the Editor 5/30/18- Ag Center

Dear Editor

This is in regards to the news item about the proposed Ag Center. In the article it stated that the center “would serve as a formal meeting place to allow for banquets and group meetings hosting large number of participants.” Is this the sole purpose of the Center? If not, why weren’t more details given in the meeting/newspaper [Tomahawk]?

If it’s just for a meeting place then how many meeting places does the county need? The public was informed when the Armory and Welcome Center were built that they would be available for public use for meetings, dinner, etc. We also have the Crewette building and the Kathleen S. Mount meeting room at the library. We also have a few church’s with large fellowship halls and kitchens that are available to the public.

How much cost to the county (taxpayers) will be needed on a monthly, yearly basis for maintenance, utilities, insurance, etc? In other words, is this a necessary expenditure for the continued development of our county?

Lynn Adams

Letters to the Editor 5/30/18- Thank You

The Johnson County Lions Club wishes to thank The Tomahawk for its coverage of the recent Turtle Derby. This is the only fund raising event for the Lions Club each year so we rely upon the help of the local media outlets to help with its promotion.

This well attended event was the fifteenth year for the running of the turtles, and the kids of Johnson County had a wonderful time cheering them to the finish line.
The Lions Club is appreciative of the 93 businesses and individuals who sponsored turtles or provided door prizes to make this event such a success. Special recognition goes to Joe Herman, Herman Trucking, for contributing the two bicycles given as door prizes.
Proceeds will help provide vision care to qualifying Johnson County citizens.

If you are in need of this kind of assistance contact a member of the Lions Club for more information. The local chapter also supports the International Lions Club with other projects such as disaster relief.  In addition the local group is responsible for the flag display in downtown Mountain City on most federal holidays.

Letter to the Editor 5-23-18

Dear Editor,
It is a beautiful day outside. The sun is shining and the weather is nice. Yesterday it was raining and a little chilly. It was still a beautiful day. This is a great Spring, and Summer is coming on fast. We have a very serious problem in the United States with opioids and drugs in general. The children will be out of school soon and they are vulnerable. Everyone is vulnerable; from childhood all the way to folks in Senior Living facilities.The problem shows no real signs of abating. Deaths, physical harm and mental debilitation are still occurring at a horrendous rate.

What to do?

Keep the kids busy this summer. Playing ball, going for walks, going to the library, going to the market, doing chores, playing Frisbee, going swimming, hiking, visiting museums, go back to the library and repeat all summer long. It’s hard, I know. We all have different levels of income and it’s not easy all the time. It can be done, however, and it can be done well.

Walking, talking, visiting, keeping an eye out, these things are good for the children, adults and seniors as well. They’re good for everybody. We need each other. So many people have been hurt and we need to stop it.We can do it and we will do it, all together.  I wish you a happy week and weekend, a wonderful summer time and a bright fall and winter this year. All good things to you and yours,

Sincerely,
Alfred Brock

Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,
It is often said that some parents tend to disengage from their children’s education. This translates into “giving up” or resigning the parent role. The exercise of a parent’s authority tends to encounter various difficulties, whether it is due to a parent’s personal education (e.g. lack of clear cut criteria, patience, firmness, or serenity), or due to their children’s education (e.g. lack of love and respect for elders).

However, nowadays it is notably environmental pressures that tend to have a stronger influence.
The following are examples of factors that influence a parent’s authority in a negative manner: the behavior of other parents; the lack of positive mass media; arbitrariness as the standard; the limited cultural content on television; the movies; Internet; confusion caused by doctrines; the rise of eroticism; the manipulation of advertisements; the confusion between tolerance and the abdication of rights and obligations; etc.

Are all environmental influences negative? Of course not, the mass media can also contribute in building critical thinking and maturity in a person. On some occasions, environmental media do not seek to distort users, but neither to educate them. One example is advertising, since its main goal is to sell more than one product, and not to sell it in the best way possible.

An educator, for example, seeks to spend better and not necessarily spend more. The goals of the consumerist society and those of the educational society are not the same. After watching television commercial ads, parents find it more difficult to create an austere family environment.
On other occasions even, environmental pressures directly go against education. Eroticism and pornography, other than generating abundant income for its promoters, they consciously degrade human values.

Due to these and other environmental pressures, nowa-days the exercise of parental authority has become more difficult. This is why it is even more important to reflect upon the education of our children and collaborate with teachers of education centers to carry out the difficult task of educating (Translated by Gianna A. Sanchez Moretti).
Arturo Ramo

Letter to the Editor

Many families take advantage of school report cards to talk with their children about school. Even if the report card is itself important, it should not be the sole standard to evaluate a child’s academic performance, since every child is different and so are his or her circumstances.
A child’s academic performance is satisfactory when it conforms to his or her intellectual capacity and realized effort. Performance is sufficient when a student’s grade level is “passed” or “progresses adequately”.
Two paradoxical situations may occur. The first one would be that the student passes with a sufficient grade point average, but his or her performance is clearly unsatisfactory because the student could have gotten a better grade as a result of improving his or her learning capacity according to what was expected. This is the case of gifted students that with explanations and little effort obtain a passing grade. It also depends, however, how demanding the teacher is and if he or she is satisfied with the minimum obtained basic knowledge.
The second situation would be if the student makes a big effort and dedicates many hours to studying but does not achieve a sufficient grade. This depends on whether the student’s studying methods are efficient (or not), whether the student lacks the minimum basic knowledge of a certain subject in order to progress, or whether the teacher is too demanding.
Nevertheless, parents should not value in themselves the grades their children obtain in school because they could be making three mistakes. The first one is to demand their child less than what he or she is capable of giving, thus fomenting commodity and conformism. By not acquiring the habit of studying, the student s propelled to fail in the future even if now he or she is passing by a margin.
The second one would be to demand the student more than what he or she is capable of giving. Expecting a high performance from an average student that tries hard to progress could stir a state of anguish and anxiety within the student that could lead to desperation and the explicit refusal to study.
The last mistake would be
to demand all children the same expectations, when in reality each one of them is different. Comparisons between siblings or classmates always produce negative consequences and can lead to jealousy or envy.
Rather than assessing the report card itself, one must consider whether the academic performance that each student achieves is satisfactory with his or her capacity, and most of all, if the student has given his or her maximum effort and dedication to the daily labor of studying
Arturo Ramo
(Translated by Giann A. Sanchez Moretti)