Letters to the Editor

Dear Editor

I would like to express my concern of the lack of clean lakes and streams for the sake of native fish for which I feel that the state of Tennessee should be responsible even if it means hiring people to use boats to do the job.
Thank you,
Kenneth Paul Sluder
P.S. Happy New Year

Letters to the Editor

Dear Editor
Since pricing of gasoline is very HIGH in Johnson County compared to other counties around us, WHY isn’t someone doing anything to fix the problem or investigate? Crude oil as of Jan 4th, 2019 was going for $47.96! There is NO reason for high prices in our county.
In Butler, gas was listed at a store/gas station for $2.40. In Town it is going for $2.31. If you drive to Carter County in Hampton, gas was $1.99 last week at the Shell station next to Dunkin Donuts.
This week I got gas at the Wal-Mart station and shopped in Lowes in Abingdon VA, which was advertised for $2.02 less three cents discount for $1.99. It is only 26 miles from my home and have the chance to purchase donuts at DD.
I would shop more in Johnson County, however it is TOO expensive!
Elizabeth Remis

Dear Editor,
I recently read the large article that Mr. Tom Hastings wrote this past week regarding fake news. I believe that everyone has the right to express their views and Mr. Hastings made it perfectly clear that he has no respect for our elected President calling him quote “a peerless disgrace.”
He also defends left wing news media personalities such as Jake Tapper, Rachel Maddow and Anderson Cooper as being reliable sources, even though they have called our President everything from a Nazi to a terrorist to a racist and so on.
The best defense was that of George Soros, the left wing radical billionaire who is behind funding Antifa and other violent, destructive demonstrations. All you have to do is ask them, since several of them have admitted they are being paid by him to terrorize and destroy American citizen’s properties.
You may not like our President Mr. Hastings, but he was elected fairly and loves this country and everything it stands for.
Sheryl Courtney

Letters to the Editor: MyRide transportation

November 21, 2018

Dear Editor,

MyRide Transportation is my ride to a pleasant afternoon doing whatever “floats my boat”! This is a blessing to all seniors not able to drive and who do not live in town. Whether you just want to wander around town and stop in the different shops and go into your favorite place for a bite to eat it leads to a relaxing day.

It is your choice to plan the day with going to a craft center, getting your hair done, shopping or meeting a friend for lunch. This was my first experience with MyRide, and I went home happy and filled with thoughts of planning my next day out. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate Kathy Motsinger for bringing this transportation program to the Johnson County Senior Center. Hiring Danae Marshall has been wonderful as the MyRide Coordinator. She goes above and beyond to help you.

The driver was very courteous and helpful with carrying my shopping bags to my doorstep. It was a great experience. What more could one ask for? It was a day not having to do something but doing whatever “floats my boat.” I highly recommend this program – try it, you will like it!!!

Sincerely, Valerie Edes

Letters to the Editor- Mayor Parsons

November 21, 2018

A letter from Mountain City Mayor Kevin Parsons

Dear Editor,
I wanted to express my thanks and appreciation for the Tomahawk sports editor, Tim Chambers, again for his excellent coverage of our local sports here in Mountain City.  I have yet to read an article from another sportswriter that makes any game played as clear and concise as he does. I know that he “gets it” when it comes to knowing what just a small recognition does for a talented athlete when they have excelled in a game.

The fact of the matter is how Tim is able to do that each week for each game whether football, tennis or volleyball is a talent all in itself and he is to be commended for it. I firmly believe that without the recognition one deserves when a notable accomplishment is made, there is a sense of not having a desire to push harder whether it be for that person or others following in their steps. Tim’s coverage of our high school football team again this year is a prime example of why I am writing this letter as many believed our 11-1 season last year would turn into a 1-11 season this year since many on last years team graduated.

I can’t help but to believe that Tim’s great sports coverage is a large part of the drive that helped the team have another great season. My desire to serve our community is only because I feel we can do better for our youth and my goal at the end of the day is to make sure I have tried to do that.  Tim’s work showcasing our athletes helps others outside of this town see that we are a community that does come together and cares about each other. That goes such a long way and helps my job of trying to recruit new opportunities for business or industry here so much easier.  Our community, like many other small co

mmunities in the region, historically have higher rates of both adult and juvenile delinquencies when it compares with other areas.
I have said it to other sportswriters before and would like to say it again that, since Tim began covering sports for The Tomahawk, I have personally seen an improvement in not only our athletic programs from baseball, football, basketball, and even tennis but an improvement as a whole in how our young people become young adults and future leaders in our community.

In closing, while I certainly love seeing my children mentioned in the articles, we know they are given the encouragement and attention from Ann and myself to make them reach higher to achieve their goals.  When Tim covers the players that don’t have that same family support and involvement we give our kids, that helps those kids improve in every game and in life.

Anytime I am given the opportunity to carry on a conversation with our athletes and fans for that matter, what is usually hear is how much what Tim writes helps all the players and fans of our Longhorn teams to achieve more.
I feel the pride this gives them and myself along with many others here in our town. I can’t help but think that showcasing our sports and the good things that happen in our town will produce better leaders and make our city prosper in the future and I for one appreciate Mr. Chambers for doing that.

Sincerely,
Kevin Parsons
Mayor, Town of Mountain City Tennessee

Letters to the editor: kudos

November 14, 2018

Dear Editor,

We would like to express our thanks to the County commissioners for approving the new tile on Big Dry Run Road. We also thank the County highway department for installing it. They did a wonderful job. The crew that did the work on it could not be beat.

Thanks again,
The Cress family

Letters to the editor: strengthening will power

November 14, 2018

The two main pillars of human personality are intelligence and affection. The first aspect is more predominant in some men, making them fundamentally rational. Others, on the contrary, are more effective and sentimental. Other than these two aspects, there is a vast gamma of intermediate types that characterology has defined along with different psychological elements.

In addition to the two basic pillars of reason and love, free will is the bridge between them, which strengthens them throughout their development. A person with great intelligence and weak will power will have a hard time reaching the life objectives that they have established for themselves by living an irregular life with ups and downs and without security. On the contrary, someone with an average intellect but with a strong will power will have a constant and organized life, personal discipline and self exigency, reaching to large extent the established goals.

In the research study entitled “The influence of study habits in academic achievement”, which deals about the influence that intelligence and motivation (i.e. the strength of one’s will power) have in school report cards, it is concluded that motivation has more statistical weight than does intelligence. Another conclusion is that inner motivation (i.e. studying because one wants to) is more important than external ones (i.e. studying because one is forced to). Out of all educators, it is known that the family is the decisive environmental factor that directly influences a child’s education and academic performance. Parents within their role of educators use the reward and punishment system. Behavioral psychologist Skinner would affirm that the good management of the reward and punishment duo depended on whether children had a good or bad education. Parents rely on the authority and affection of their role as educators; an authority that is both demanding and stimulating, and at the same time creator of a joyous and friendly environment.

In order to strengthen will power it is convenient to follow a strategy of small conquests: comply with obligations even if one does not want to; comply with daily duties even if one does not feel like it; deny to one’s own self small caprices in order to have self control; etc. It is necessary to acquire a series of habits such as respecting schedules, having everything on tables and closets organized, planning tasks that must be done as well as making the effort to fulfill them all, accepting setbacks and having tolerance in facing frustrations.
These types of habits strengthen one’s will power and help make humans stronger, more secure and stable, and the master of one’s own self. A fortress wall is built against the temptations of today such as drugs, alcohol, and infidelity, and at the same time it becomes easier to reach the goals that one establishes for him or herself (Translated by Gianna A. Sanchez Moretti).
Arturo Ramo

Letters to the editor: United Way

November 7, 2018

Dear Editor,

It is with a heavy heart that the United Way of Mountain City, Johnson County announces that effective December 31, 2018 we will no longer be active. After 21 years of fund raising campaigns, our United Way raised more than $800,000 for agencies serving Johnson County. Nevertheless, the all-volunteer Board has determined that other community projects and personal obligations preclude us from the substantial efforts involved in running fund raising campaign and associated administrative requirements. Having exhausted all efforts to find others to pick up this volunteer service, we will cease operations at the end of this calendar year. We are proud of what has been accomplished on our watch.

It has been our pleasure and joy to be involved with the many human care agencies funded in those 21 years. Johnson County citizens have supported our United Way generously with their donations so that the many incredible organizations here have been able to address their missions a little easier with this financial help. These organizations continue to impact so many lives every day and we are truly proud to have been a small part of that. Many of you have served on our Board of Directors and Allocation Panels over the years – giving your time and experience to help us make a difference in Johnson County. We thank you for that support.

So while we will not be in business, it is our hope that our community donors will continue to support the organizations that have participated in prior United Way campaigns. They can do so by making donations directly to the organizations of their choice. Thank you Johnson County for your continued and generous support over the years. Together we have definitely made a difference.

For the Board
Ruth Ann Osborn

Letters to the editor: Bredesen visit

October 24, 2018

Dear Editor,

In a recent article about Governor Phil Bredesen’s trip to Northeast Tennessee, you referenced “hecklers” in the crowd.  While these young men were indeed hecklers, they were doing so at the behest of Tennessee Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn. In fact, they are paid to do so by  Blackburn’s campaign and at least one of its allies. These young men have attempted to be disruptive at several events that Governor Bredesen has held around the state.  Thankfully, they have flatly failed in these efforts.

While they have dishonestly identified themselves as “concerned citizens” to other attendees, including members of the media, they have identified themselves to others as employees of Blackburn for Senate and America Rising PAC, a right-wing dark money organization out of DC. The actions of these young men are part and parcel of the hyper-partisan Swamp politics coming out of Washington these days. It’s no surprise that Blackburn would employ such tactics after 16 years in the Swamp, but Tennesseans deserve far better from anyone that wants to be one of our elected leaders.

Mark Brown
Tennessee Democratic Party

Letters to the editor: Ford and Kavanaugh

October 24, 2018

 Dear Editor,

We American people were not served well by Judge Kavanaugh’s hurried confirmation process and the FBI investigation constrained by limits on time and witnesses. Christine Ford says Kavanaugh pushed her down on a bed and tried to remove her clothes when she was 15 and he 17 and drunk.  She is probably telling the truth, as the memory of such an assault is seared into one’s indelibly.  He says he doesn’t remember the incident.
He is probably telling the truth too, having been unable to imprint the memory in his brain due to an alcoholic blackout.

Her story is not unusual or unique.  As a physician, I hear similar stories almost every day at work.  Women tell of being molested as children or raped as teens and adults and not reporting the attacks because they felt scared and helpless and were afraid they would not believe or taken seriously, then holding in their feelings of shame and worthlessness and having difficulties in trusting others and problems in their intimate relationships.

Some tell their stories years later to a physician or a therapist with whom they feel safe, as did Ms. Ford several years ago. Subsequently, upon Kavanaugh’s nomination to become a Supreme Court justice, Ms. Ford felt it her civic duty to tell the Senate about this part of his personality and character. Appointments to the highest court in our land should be given to men and women of exemplary character and the highest ethical standards.  The FBI should have been allowed to do a thorough investigation before the Senate voted on Kavanaugh’s appointment, and his rage and partisan comments should have disqualified him for the position.  The Senate failed in their responsibility to us, the American people.

Thank you for considering my viewpoint.
Neal Sanders, M.D.

Letters to the editor: The value of the example

October 10, 2018

Dear Editor,

Educational authorities frequently repeat that education never ends and one of the cores of this law of education is the continuing education. This is especially necessary for educators (parents and teachers) because they have to develop themselves as individuals, parents, educators, professionals and Christians to improve other people.

Teachers pretend that young people are educated, have the habit of reading and study, know to take advantage the free time for their personal enrichment and that their subsequent work has a purpose of service to others. But parents and teachers should set an example in all of this.

Teachers educate students with their words, but above everything with the way they are and their example. Experts in education say that words move, but the example draw. The example given in the family is the footprint that remains in children. The behavior of parents is a stimulus and points the way of the behavior of children. They admire their teachers and parents by their fight ability to improve themselves as individuals.

Perhaps the most important aspect of this matter is the consistency. It is essential the consistency of parents between what they say and what they do, as well as between what they demand to their children and what they demand to themselves. If this consistency is applied, parents will gain in prestige and credibility to exercise authority in the family.

If teachers neglect their own personal development it will be difficult to achieve the internal development of children and students, because only educate those who make an effort to improve their own level of development; only teach those who are still learning in adulthood and only help to mature those who have a certain level of maturity.

All this leads to a certain requirement of self-education by teachers, because no one can give what does not have/

Arturo Ramo

Letters to the editor: anti “Editorial Public Enemies”

October 3, 2018

Editor’s note: In response to our recent editorial page, I have received several letters expressing opinion of a piece written by Nu Yang entitled “Editorial Public Enemies,” which was originally published in the September 11, 2018 issue of Editor & Publisher. Two of such letters to the editor are printed below. I would like to thank their authors for reading The Tomahawk, as well as making use of the media, which allow many to be heard and personal opinions to be expressed.
Thank you,
Editor,

‘Editorial Public Enemies’

Dear Editor,

The Tomahawk continues to disappoint with their “Editorial” selections.
Another laughable waste of ink and space regarding the danger to the media and democracy – right up there with the recent tome like discussion of “man made climate change” by a political science major.

When journalist return to journalism instead of the current trend to make up stories, slant information and right out create propaganda that supports their personal beliefs maybe they will regain their stature as being an essential part of democracy.

But as they continue to try to manipulate public opinion rather than report facts they will remain an enemy of a true free society. The fact that we have a President that calls them out on their lies is the biggest boost this country has had to true democracy in a decade.

As to their safety, another laughable premise, until they start slanting their reporting to propagandize for conservative philosophies they are safe and sound as has been proven time and again – it is the left that resorts to actual violence. Holding Acosta up as a role model of journalism in this piece is the funniest part of all as any derision pointed at him is well earned.

Deborah Roush


Dear Editor,

In response to the “editorial public “ enemies” I offer the following.

There should be no friendly media or unfriendly media but only a media that reports the facts and not give opinions detrimental to the facts. All forms of media should not be one that is biased to the media’s representatives be they media owners and/or editors.

Fake, disgusting, failing, the enemy, these are a few words that the left wing liberal media are guilty of today. They support a socialism to bring America down to their level.

I suggest the mass media start addressing the meaningful, relevant, issues and not attack those that are attempting to solve the problems. The media should focus on the problems of illegal aliens, health care, employment for those on welfare by providing concrete solutions that are not biased. Housing and food should be basics with solutions not relying on social programs that only enable the individuals of these programs to fall further into socialism and more dependent upon the socialistic programs. They need jobs not social programs.

You freely use the words “a commitment to free speech and a free press” but only what meets what standards that suit your personal views. You state “the press is not the enemy” I contend the press/media is the enemy because I believe they are self serving and not in the best interest of the American people.

The media needs to start addressing why our representatives and senators fail to address the issues without political party affiliation differences. Common sense is totally lacking in our representatives. They focus on political party agendas, period. Where is the media to report on this problem without choosing sides themselves.

A pew research center poll found liberals outnumber conservatives by some five to one. When you are a liberal and everyone else around you is as well it is easy to fall into group thinking on what stories are important, what sources are legitimate and what the narrative of the day will be.

The liberal media should start taking personal as well as professional responsibility. Still wonder who wrote the article without leaving their name as required by the Tomahawk.

George A. Spreyne
The value of the example

Letters to the editor- St. Anthony’s

Dear Editor,

St. Anthony Bread Food Pantry would like to thank Harbin Hill farms and Richard Calkins for sponsoring a fundraising concert to benefit our food pantry. We are appreciative not only for the monies that were raised but also for the opportunity to debut the ecumenical choir made up of members of several churches under the direction of Marie-Jo Thum.

The choir entertained and led the attendees in a community sing of old favorite gospel music. Thanks to the Privette Family Musicians and Johnson County Children’s Community Chorus who also performed at the event.

Sincerely,
Leni Smith,

Letters to the editor: kudos from the pregnancy center

Thank you to everyone who came out in support of the Pregnancy Support Center of Johnson County.The first Annual BBQ Cook Off was VERY successful! We couldn’t have done this without our volunteers, those who donated food and time, or SSG Christopher Pierce at the National Guard Armory. Thanks again! David Watson won our BBQ Cook Off with his Chicken BBQ and homemade sauce.

Congratulations!
The Board of JSCJC

Letters to the Editor: story kudos

I just wanted to thank you so much for the wonderful story Jin has done for the Sr. Heating Fund. Donations are coming in a little along the way… The story was great.. I will write to the Editor at the end of this month, to let all those who have donated know how much we raised and to thank the Tomahawk and those who contributed for their help. You are good to do these things for our county.

May God Bless,
Gwen Bell

Letter to the editor: What is a welcome center?

What is a “Welcome Center”?

Dear Editor,

We have Welcome Centers along the interstate to welcome us to that particular state or locality.  We also have them in practically every town or city. They are a place where we can gather information about what is happening in that state or town, usually a great source of maps, brochures, flyers, or whatever materials needed to advertise and entice travelers, or even residents to participate or patronize the local events or businesses.

This is true even of our local Welcome Center here in Mountain City, TN. It is a beautiful facility filled with local artifacts, books, brochures, and wealth of information to help travelers as well as locals, find what they are looking for. If they don’t have the info you want handy, they can usually get it either through the Internet or a couple of phone calls, which they are glad to do.

So, my point here is with all this willingness to get out the info to everyone about everything going on in Johnson County, why are they being ignored when it comes to some local events, for instance, “The Long Journey Home” music event coming up this week? They advertise for it, they give out maps and brochures for it, but are not part of the tour. You would think that is where it should start. You would go there, pick up your tour map, some local info and then start the tour. Nope, not here.

They are not recognized as any part of the event.  So, as to attempt to gain some recognition for the Welcome Center this year, we are promoting it with local music and still giving out all the info for the county events. So, come by on September 1, and hear local bluegrass gospel band The Privette Family and tour our beautiful welcome center and find info about local events and what’s happening in Johnson County.
Thank you for visiting our Welcome Center.
Tommy Privette

Letters to the editor: Put a stop to brake trouble before school starts

Dear Editor,

When it comes to vehicle safety, the brake system is at the top of the list. Brake Safety Awareness Month is the ideal time for drivers to stop and make sure their brakes are working properly before the new school year and colder temperatures arrive. Motorists can put a stop to any potential brake problems by recognizing the signs and symptoms that their brake system may need maintenance or repair.

Typical warning signs include the car pulling to the left or right, noises when applying the brakes, an illuminated brake warning light, brake grabbing, low pedal feel, vibration, hard pedal feel and squealing.  Several factors that affect brake wear include driving habits, vehicle type, operating conditions and the quality of the brake lining material.

For routine maintenance, drivers should check their vehicle’s braking system at least once a year.
A thorough inspection should include brake lining wear, brake fluid level, rotor thickness, condition of hoses and brake lines, brake and dash warning lights, as well as taking the car for a test drive to detect other potential brake system problems.

Drivers should never put off routine brake inspections or many needed repair, such as letting the brakes get to the “metal-to-metal” point, which can be potentially dangerous and lead to a more costly repair bill.

Sincerely,
Rich White
Executive Director
Car Care Council

Letters to the Editor: Kudos

From the Trade VFD

The Trade Volunteer Fire Department would like to thank everyone who came out and supported the fire department at the benefit on Sunday July 29, at the Trade Community center. There was good food and good gospel music and a good time for all. We would like to thank all the workers and all the singers for giving their time and talents to benefit the fire department.

Thank you.

Letters to the Editor: Active shooter drill

Dear Editor,

I would like to thank you and the Tomahawk again for coming out and giving everyone involved in the recent active shooter school safety drill an avenue to get the word out to our community.
We are taking every opportunity to ensure that our schools are safe and that we are all prepared to handle the situations we do not want to happen.

Thank you,

Special Response Team commander Sgt. Jeff Norman

Letters to the Editor: Welcome back

Dear Editor,

My mom is Judy Snyder and she quit subscribing to the Tomahawk because it had gotten so boring but she told me today that it was getting more interesting again and the pictures are so nice.  She asked me to email and let you know that she is going to subscribe again! My son plays basketball so I always get the paper during ball season but I may also subscribe if you keep up the good work!  Love reading about our little town! Keep up the good work!

Amy Thompson