Sheriff’s Report

1/11/2019

01/04/2019 Casey R Adkins, Stout Rd, Violation Of Probation
01/04/2019 Kevin M Buchanan, Pedro Shoun Ln, Theft $500 < $1,000
01/04/2019 Chris R Lash, Elizabethton, Failure To Appear
01/04/2019 Timothy C Robinson, Hwy 421 S, Assault As Domestic Violence, Aggravated Burglary
01/04/2019 Blaise M Samion, Roan Creek Rd, Violation Of Probation
01/04/2019 David W Swift, Gentry Creek Rd, Contempt Of Court – Juvenile Court
01/04/2019 Taylor L Wagner, Illinois St, Failure To Appear
01/04/2019 Matthew L Widner, Forge Rd, Driving Under The Influence, Driving On Revoked Drivers License 3Rd Offense
01/05/2019 Jake H Potter, Morefield Rd, Simple Possession Of Schedule Vi Drugs, Driving Under The Influence
01/07/2019 James L Canter, Powell St, Driving Under The Influence, Violation Of Implied Consent Law
01/08/2019 Dallas T Ferguson, Trout Run Rd, Criminal Trespassing
01/08/2019 Shevin R Greene, Claude Warren Rd, Violation Of Probation
01/08/2019 Kevin D Parsons, Acorn St, Obstruction Of Justice
01/09/2019 Kevin M Buchanan, Pedro Shoun Ln, Violation Of Probation
01/09/2019 Timothy Z Church, Mae Tester Ln, Capias – Juvenile Court
01/09/2019 Gregory M Johnson, Reece Rd, Violation Of Probation
01/10/2019 Timothy R Church, Cobb Creek Rd, Driving On Revoked Drivers License
01/10/2019 Reagan A Click, Muskrat Ramble Rd, Violation Of Community Corrections
01/10/2019 Velarde U Hubertc, West Holy Hill Rd, Driving With No Drivers License

Bishop arrested

Editor’s note:

This story first appeared online and is a follow up/updated version of the original post

 

Johnson County Schools transportation supervisor indicted on theft charge.

By Tamas Mondovics

A joint investigation by Special Agents with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury has led to the indictment of the Johnson County Board of Education Transportation Supervisor.
TBI reported that Johnson County Board of Education Transportation Supervisor Barry Lawrence Bishop, 57, had been charged with theft over $10,000.
The news of Bishop’s arrest, which was reported by The Tomahawk’s home page and Facebook and included several adjustments as the story developed prompted a sizable response from county residents expressing their dismay over the incident and its reflection on Johnson County Schools as well as its director, Mischelle Simcox.
According to TBI, in May 2018, at the request of 1st District Attorney General Ken Baldwin, Special Agents began investigating allegations of theft involving Bishop.
During the investigation, TBI agents developed information that between January 2015 and May 2017, Bishop used his position as the transportation supervisor for the school system to perform skills testing for commercial driver’s license applicants.
The investigation revealed that Bishop collected nearly $50,000 in fees associated with the testing but failed to give the funds to the Johnson County Trustee.
In response, to the incident Simcox stated:
“Johnson County Schools learned of Mr. Barry Bishop’s arrest when he was taken into custody on January 3, 2019. The school system was later told that Mr.Bishop’s theft charge stemmed from a joint investigation by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Tennessee Comptroller’s Office. Johnson County Schools has and always will remain transparent with the Comptroller’s Office, and the school system will certainly cooperate in any way with the authorities concerning this matter.”
The Johnson County Grand Jury returned an indictment this week charging Bishop with one count of theft over $10,000. Bishop was arrested and booked into the Johnson County Jail on a $15,000 bond.
Unfortunately, Bishop’s arrest was only a continuation of troubled times for JC Schools due to questionable conduct on the part of its staff including the transportation supervisor.
In an early December 2018 report, the comptroller reported the results of an investigation of selected records of the Johnson County School Department for the period May 1, 2017, through July 31, 2017.
The report revealed that some school department employees used assets owned by the department for private purposes and that management allowed employees at the school department’s transportation garage to use the facility to work on their personal vehicles and other vehicles for personal gain.
The comptroller said that based on interviews, employees performed maintenance on their vehicles after normal working hours with parts and supplies purportedly purchased with their personal funds. School department employees informed the comptroller that management allowed them to use school department vehicles, machinery, and tools for personal use.
Some former and current department employees admitted using department-owned lawnmowers and tools for personal use, the report said.
In one instance, the school transportation supervisor had a school department employee deliver a load of old shingles from the supervisor’s home to the county transfer station using a department-owned dump truck, during regular working hours, the report said.
The investigation showed that Bishop has borrowed the department’s dump truck over the weekend for personal use while having his home roof repaired, but said that “the employee needed the dump truck the following Monday morning to retrieve a load of rock for a bus turnaround, and he had the employee dump the shingles at the transfer station while en route to the rock quarry.”
The comptroller recommended that school department management should not allow, and department employees should not use department assets for private purposes.
In response to the report, and to bring its policies in harmony with the state recommendations, Simcox stated, “Johnson County School System will be updating our school board policy 3.301 (Use of Equipment and Supplies) to the recommendations found in our finding.”

Simcox emphasized that the information will be
shared with all employees, especially those in maintenance.
“We will stress that school employees are not allowed to use school equipment for private purposes,” she said.
For more information about Johnson County Schools please visit www.jocoed.net.

Sheriff’s Report

1/4/2019

12/28/2018 Aaron E Johnson, J Hodge Rd,Violation Of Probation
12/28/2018 Shatona L Lunceford, Lodge St, Capias – Failure To Appear
12/29/2018 Steve W Arnold, Mtn City, Simple Assault Involving A Child
12/29/2018 Leigh S Hammons, Mtn City, Criminal Impersonation, Resisitng Arrest, Fugitive From Justice
12/29/2018 Donnelly M Lewis, Furnance Creek Rd, Felony Possession Of Schedule Ii Drugs, Simple Possession Of Schedule Ii Drugs, Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia
12/29/2018 Steven D Perry, Modock Rd, Aggravated Kidnapping, Rape
12/30/2018 Ruthie N Canter, Rainbow Rd, Violation Of Bond Conditions
12/31/2018 Casey R Adkins, Stout Rd, Driving On Unregistered Vehicle, Driving On Suspended Drivers License
12/31/2018 David A Cooper, Cooper Fork Mtn Rd, Capias, Carry/Possession Of A Weapon, Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia
12/31/2018 Pauletta Dunn, Chillicothe Il, Possession Of Schedule Ii Drugs For Resale, Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia
12/31/2018 Brittany L Howard, Graybeal Ave, Violation Of Probation
01/01/2019 Matthew C Blackwelder, Todd Nc, Drinking/Possession Of Alcohol While Under Age
01/01/2019 David W Bodenhamer, Dug Hill Rd, Driving Under The Influence Underage)
01/01/2019 John Carrol, Dry Hill Rd, Public Intoxication, Possession Of Schedule Ii Drugs, Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia
01/01/2019 Geoffrey R Carroll, Norman Dugger Rd, Possession Of Schedule Ii Drugs, Driving Under The Inlfuence
01/01/2019 Amos L Earp, Boone Nc, Assault As Domestic Violence
01/01/2019 Megan L Maze, Mill Creek Rd, Evading Arrest On Foot, Failure To Appear For Jail Time X 2, Violation Of Probation
01/02/2019 Willie Davis Jr, Bristol Tn, Conspiracy To Committ Aggravated Robbery, Aggravated Kidnapping, Aggravated Robbery, Aggravated Burglary, False Report To Authorities
01/02/2019 Brittany N Dugger, Village Square Ln, Criminal Conspiracy To Committ Theft, Simple Possession, Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia
01/02/2019 Daniel L Hicks, Piney Flats, Public Intoxication, Possession Of Schedule Ii Drugs,
01/02/2019 Jennifer L Jenkins, Bristol Tn, Conspiracy To Committ Aggravated Robbery, Aggravated Kidnapping, Aggravated Robbery, Aggravated Burglary, False Report To Authorities
01/02/2019 Greggory L Johnson, Vilas Nc, Driving On Suspended Drivers License
01/02/2019 Dakota J Lawton, Mountain Site Dr, Violation Of Probation
01/02/2019 Steven T Mcguire, Eggers Branch Rd, Illegal Possession Of A Weapon, Possession Of Methamphetamine, Violation Of Probation
01/02/2019 Terry D Wallace, Crackers Neck Rd, Criminal Impersonation, Violation Of Probation
01/03/2019 William S Adams, Hwy 67 W, Violation Of Financial Responsibility, Simple Possession Of Schedule Ii Drugs, Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, Violation Of Registration Law, Failure To Yield To Emergency Vehciles
01/03/2019 Barry L Bishop, Mink Hills Rd, Theft $1,000 <$10,000
01/03/2019 Joseph M Bright, Mill Creek Rd, Possession Of Stolen Property, Driving An Unregistered Vehicle, Driving Under The Influence, Violation Of Implied Consent Law, Driving On Revoked Drivers License – 5Th Offense
01/03/2019 Lisa K Clawson, Spear Branch Rd, Violation Of Probation
01/03/2019 Thomas H Mccauley, Dotson Ln, Violation Of Probation
01/03/2019 Mary S Mckinnis, Chestnut Dr, Public Intoxication

There’s a new deputy in town

Johnson County Sheriff Eddie Tester congratulates Evan Martin on his completion and graduation from the Tennessee Law Enforcement Training Academy. Martin is now working with JCSO. Submitted photo

JOHNSON COUNTY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEE ARRESTED ON THEFT CHARGE

By Tamas Mondovics

 

A joint investigation by Special Agents with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury has led to the indictment of the Johnson County Board of Education Transportation Supervisor.

In May 2018, at the request of 1st District Attorney General Ken Baldwin, TBI Special Agents began investigating allegations of theft involving Barry Lawrence Bishop, 57.

During the course of the investigation, TBI agents developed information that between January 2015 and May 2017, Bishop used his position as the transportation supervisor for the school system to perform skills testing for commercial driver’s license applicants.

The investigation further revealed that Bishop collected nearly $50,000 in fees associated with the testing but failed to give the funds to the Johnson County Trustee.

Johnson County Director of Schools Mischelle Simcox issued this statement to News Channel 11:

“Johnson County Schools learned of Mr. Barry Bishop’s arrest when he was taken into custody on January 3, 2019. The school system was later told that Mr. Bishop’s theft charge stemmed from a joint investigation by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Tennessee Comptroller’s Office. Johnson County Schools has and always will remain transparent with the Comptroller’s Office, and the school system will certainly cooperate in any way with the authorities in relation to this matter.”

The Johnson County Grand Jury returned an indictment this week charging Bishop with one count of theft over $10,000.

He was arrested and booked into the Johnson County Jail on a $15,000 bond.

Judge hands down heavy sentence for child pornography offenses

Lucas Anthony Nichols sentenced to 262 months for child pornography offenses.

By Tamas Mondovics

Thanks to Project Safe Childhood (PSC), a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse another dangerous sexual predator will be off the streets for at least the next two decades.
Lucas Anthony Nichols, 40, of Knoxville, Tennessee, was sentenced by the Honorable Thomas A. Varlan, Chief U.S. District Judge, to serve 262 months (21.8 years) in federal prison for receiving and possessing child pornography. PSC was launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice.
According to state officials following his release from prison, Nichols will continue to be supervised by the U.S. Probation Office for another ten years and will be required to register with the sex offender registry in any state in which he resides, works, or attends school.
Nichols pleaded guilty to federal charges in April, stemming from an undercover investigation into the storage of child pornography over the Internet.
Law enforcement officials emphasized that search warrants were issued for Nichols’ online storage account and his residence, which revealed that Nichols had saved thousands of images and videos of child pornography on his online storage account, including sadistic depictions of the sexual abuse of young children.
While the investigation was conducted by the Knoxville Police Department’s Internet Crimes Against Children Unit, U.S. Department of Homeland Security-Homeland Security Investigations, and U.S. Postal Inspection Service and assistant U.S. Attorney Matthew Morris represented the United States in court proceedings, the crime and its effects sadly reach into every corner of the country and the planet.
“The receipt and collection of child pornography is a
serious crime that perpetuates the victimization of
children and fuels the
demand for the production of more child pornography,” said J. Douglas Overbey, U.S. Attorney for the
Eastern District of Tennessee. “Our office commends the collaborative law enforcement efforts taken to bring this defendant to justice,” added U.S. Attorney Overbey.
Led by U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, PSC marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.
For more information about PSC, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

Safety takes center stage during the holiday season

By Tamas Mondovics

Editor

The 2018 holiday season is in full swing while local officials including members of law enforcement and fire rescue are ready to offer residents some appropriate safety tips.
The Johnson County Sheriff’s Office and the Mountain City Police Department are very much aware of the potential for thefts as well as distractions that the holiday season brings.
“Many forget the very basics about safety either at home or when out shopping,” said JC Sheriff Eddie Tester.
WalletHub’s recent Holiday Studies and Reports offer many safety tips relating to protecting the consumer’s pocketbook.
The report mentioned that most consumers already have access to little-known credit card benefits that can come in handy over the holidays, including price-drop protection and coverage for damaged or stolen items.
All store credit cards do not charge an annual fee, and the average card offering rewards in the form of discounts give shoppers more than 29 percent off their first purchase, according to WalletHub’s 2018 Store Card Landscape Report.
Most of the major retailers offering zero percent financing use a dangerous feature called deferred interest, which has the potential to make holiday purchases up to 27.5 times more expensive than expected.
While for some, the joy or chore of the holiday shopping is winding down, for many a mad dash to the mall, or where they may find that perfect gift before it is too late, is yet to come.
Either way, to ensure this holiday season will not end in disappointment or disaster, putting safety first could help prevent possible crimes.

A few tips listed below may come in handy.

Shopping:
•When shopping, lock your car doors and roll up your windows.
•Limit the amount of cash you carry. If possible, pay with a credit or debit card.
•Keep your purse close to your body and your wallet in an inside jacket pocket if possible.
•Place all packages in your trunk, not visible to individuals walking close to your vehicle.
•Remember where you parked. Have your car keys in hand when approaching your vehicle.
•Don’t leave cell phones, purses or other items in your parked car where they can be seen.

When using ATMs:
•Use one in a populated area and pay constant attention to your surroundings.
•If possible, use ATMs during daylight hours.
•If anyone is lurking near the machine, pass it up and find another.
•Remember to retrieve your credit/debit card after a transaction.

At Home:
•Be cautious about locking doors and windows when you leave your home.
•Don’t display gifts where they can be seen from a window or doorway.
•Leave a light or a television on when away from home, so it seems the house is occupied.
•Be wary of strangers coming to your door asking for charitable donations.
•Do not leave boxes from gifts outside for the trash collector. Take them to a dumpster so that your house is not targeted by thieves that are looking for homes that have just bought new appliances, etc.

On Vacation:
•Before you leave, provide the Sheriff’s Office or Police department, with the dates of departure and return. Your home can be periodically checked by deputies or officers patrolling your area while you are gone.
•Notify the post office to hold your mail or arrange for a neighbor to pick up your mail daily.
-Have a neighbor pick up your newspaper each day.
-•Make arrangements to have your grass cut and watered while you are gone.
•Move valuables so not to be seen from windows.
•Have someone pick up flyers and circulars from your doorway.
•Leave your number with a trusted neighbor so that they may contact you should anything be suspicious.

Always report any / all suspicious persons, vehicles, or activity to local law enforcement.
In the event of an emergency, please dial 911.

For more report/ statistics please visit WalletHub: https://wallethub.com/edu/store-card-rates-and-rewards-report/28362/

Breaking News: Mountain City bomb threat

 

By Tamas Mondovics

Editor

Update:

 

After nearly a three-hour wait, at around 4:45 pm, and with the assistance of a bomb-sniffing dog from the Johnson City Police Department’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit, Mountain City Police Chief Denver Church and Johnson County Sheriff Eddie Tester confirmed that the scene at the Johnson County Counseling Center had been cleared.

 

“Thankfully, no explosives were found inside and or around the building,” Church said. The outcome was similar to all of the reported cases of bomb threats around the Country, at the time of this report.

 

Earlier Update:

There have been multiple reports of emailed bomb threats to businesses, universities, and newspapers across the country.

 

Mountain City Police Chief, Denver Church confirmed that today’s bomb threat emailed to the Johnson County Counseling Center at 301 Donnelly Street is the only one reported here in Mountain City.

 

Law enforcement departments, confirm that there have been dozens of threats made across the country, and so far, no credible threats have been found.

 

“These threats are also being reported to other locations nationwide, and we do not know their credibility at this time,” Church said.

 

Church said that officers are now waiting for one of their Bomb-sniffing dogs to search the building before it can be cleared.

“The dog can go through the building in just a few minutes,” he said. “If we find something we will be here all night.”

 

No motive has been identified, but according to some officials, the threats are financially motivated.

 

In New York where multiple threats were reported police said (on Twitter) that there was an “email being circulated containing a bomb threat asking for bitcoin payment” but that no devices had been found.

 

The search continues, and even with no credible threat it shook up residents and caused fear across the country.

 

Original post:

Law enforcement officers responded to a bomb threat sent via email to the Johnson County Counseling Center in Mountain City TN across from the Mountain City Elementary School this afternoon. (12/13)

 

According to Mountain City Police Chief Denver Church, dispatch received a call at around 1:50 PM on Thursday afternoon.

 

Church said, “The threat revealed that the bomb may not bring down the building but would cause injury to those inside.”

 

Police officers and deputies evacuated the building and immediate area.

 

Mountain City Elementary School is on soft lockdown for the time being.

 

At around 2:45 pm a member of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation arrived to assess the situation and follow protocol to clear the building.

 

Officials asked the employees at the counseling center to be patient as it may take an hour or more to make sure the building is safe.

 

School official said that students are not allowed to leave the building at this time, and they will determine the next step in connection with today’s dismissal. Please visit this site for an update as it becomes available.