Friday night at Red Tail Golf Course was spent celebrating the accomplishments and good work done by local leaders and citizens in Johnson County. The Johnson County Chamber of Commerce’s annual banquet was filled with food, friends, and fellowship. This night is special because it honors the men and women in the community who strive to be positive influences in their personal and professional lives.
The evening began with a welcome and introductions of special guests, which included Lt. Governor Ron Ramsey, U.S. House Rep. Dr. Phil Roe, State Representatives Timothy Hill, Jon Lunberg, and former State Representative Tony Shipley. Lunberg and Shipley are currently running for state senate.
Once introductions were made, prayer was led by Pastor Ron Drake and the meal began. Dinner was prepared by Red Tail’s culinary team, which is led by head chef, Craig Cox. Those in attendance were able to feast on a prime rib, chicken breast, roasted rainbow carrots and tri-colored potatoes, brocolini, salad, and dessert.
After dinner, Celeste Dunn honored those who had completed the year-long Leadership Program. These students and adults are sponsored by local businesses and organizations in order to prepare and motivate “community-minded leaders through education and training.” This year, nine people were able to participate in the program. Members of Leadership were able to experience many exciting opportunities in the past year.
“I enjoyed going to Nashville, it was pretty eye opening,” said Justin Hamilton. Elizabeth Stout enjoyed the time they spent at the Mountain City Care and Rehab Center. “I really enjoyed seeing the century room and appreciate the thoughtfulness of the staff to create that room to help residents.”
Bud Crosswhite, Chris Reece, Isabella Dunn, Chance McQueen, Jaime Jennings, Justin Hamilton, Dylan Nichols, Elizabeth Stout, and Sally Tugman all received certificates for their work in the program.
Next honored was Minnie Miller, who received the Mack Wright Citizenship of the Year Award. Miller has dedicated her life to education. Miller spent many years as a classroom teacher and then moved up through the administrative ladder. After her years of teaching she became the first woman in Johnson County to hold the position of Director of Curriculum, Assistant Superintendent, and Director of Schools. During Miller’s time in the Johnson County School System, she assisted the school board to improve school buildings without a tax increase, helped to start the GED program in the jail, and helped to increase test scores. Even though Miller retired in 2006, she remains active as a member on several boards in the community, is a member of The Positive Thinkers and the Eastern Star, and continues to teach in her Sunday school class at First Baptist.
For the rest of the story, pick up a copy of  this week’s Tomahawk.