Local karate team brings home medals from national qualifying competition

By: Marlana Ward

Freelance Writer

On Saturday, March 18, a local team of karateka, practioners of karate, left the high grounds of Mountain City for the urban sprawl of Charlotte, North Carolina to compete in the AAU National Championship Qualifying Competition. The team hailing from Yama Dojo, the karate school in Mountain City, set out to put their training and endurance to the test against some of the very best in the Southeast.
Hundreds of karate enthusiasts gathered at the Carole Hoefener Community Center in downtown Charlotte. Competitors were divided by gender, level of experience, and age. The floor was divided into four squares with contests being held simultaneously in each one. Spectators in the stands were treated to the opportunity to witness the differences in styles and schools as the skilled martial artists gave their best before judges, peers, and supporters.
Representing Yama Dojo was the team of Trish Hook, Ashley Cole, William Butler, Rory Springer, and Adam Manuel. The team has been trained under the watchful eyes of Sensei (teacher) Hotaru Rebekah Darocha and Sensei Monjin Chris Hook. Many hours of practice, drops of sweat, and even blistered hands were endured as the team readied themselves for battle.
As part of the Kurokawa family of karateka, Yama Dojo has a lot to live up to. Founded by Soke (grand master) Dr. Timothy Brooks and Lady Teruko Brooks, all Kurokawa dojos, or schools, are known for their high standards and dedication to the art of karate. Yama Dojo also holds the distinction of being a ministry based dojo, dedicating themselves to not only training their bodies but also using their talents in service to God and being a light wherever the team travels.
There were three types of competition held at the AAU event. The first was kata in which a series of martial arts moves are performed in sequence. Next was the weapon demonstrations of kobudo. Yama Dojo had competitors using bo staff, kama (similar to sickles), and sai, a three-pronged weapon. The final competition style was that of kumite, which is the sparring between two karateka in which either half or full points are awarded for hits with the first to reach three points being declared the winner.
Yama Dojo made a solid entry in to this year’s AAU Nationals with all members of the team being awarded multiple medals within their divisions. In the Novice 15 to 16 year old division, Adam Manuel was awarded silver in both kobudo and kata. In Intermediate 15 to 16, Rory Springer won gold for his performance in kata along with silver with his fighting skills in kumite. Competing in the highly challenging 17-year old advanced division, William Butler won silver in kobudo and bronze in kata. Ashley Cole brought home gold in kata and silver in kobudo within her intermediate division. In her ladies’ advanced division, Trish Hook won the gold medal for kata as well as the silver in kobudo.
The regional competition was just beginning for Yama Dojo with the team traveling to Apex, North Carolina for the Super Regional Competition on April 29th followed by the AAU National Championship June 28th through July 1st. The team will be holding various fundraisers in hopes of earning the community’s much needed support for the cost of sending the talented team to compete. Anyone interested in learning more about the dojo is encouraged to visit Mondays and Thursdays at 5:30 pm at Bethany Baptist Church located on Hwy 67W.

Charles McQueen working to preserve the land he loves in Shady Valley for 20 years

By:  Rebecca Herman

Freelance Writer

 

Shady Valley is well known for its beautiful landscape, sprawling farms, and cranberry bogs. Within Shady Valley, there are several preserves that are owned by The Nature Conservancy whose goal is to maintain and protect the bogs and endangered bog turtles. In March of 1997, The Nature Conservancy enlisted Charles McQueen to officially become the Preserves manager and 20 years later McQueen is still working diligently.
“Over the past 20 years, he has been instrumental in the restoration of our orchard bog and quarry bog preserves (home to endangered bog turtles), building the boardwalk at Schoolyard Springs and doing a thousand and one things to maintain all four preserves,” said Paul Kingsbury, Director of Communications at Tennessee Chapter of The Nature Conservancy.
In addition to being the Preserves manager, McQueen works on his family farm, owns a farm equipment business, and is the fire chief of the Shady Valley Volunteer Fire Department. McQueen’s family had taken care of some of the land before he officially was hired by The Nature Conservancy, but it was not until after he was hired that he was able to really get down to work.
“Through the years land has been donated to us, so we have more area to maintain,” said McQueen. The bulk of what McQueen does deals with keeping the lands clear of invasive plants that could put the cranberry bogs and bog turtles at risk. “We do prescribed burns, we do selective logging, and we rotate livestock to keep the grounds clear.” McQueen has been able to travel around the United States with The Nature Conservancy to help other people with prescribed burns.
“We work closely with neighbors and the community and they are supportive of what we are doing here,” said McQueen. McQueen said that he tries to lease out the land to different people to keep the land working and that there are a couple cabins on property that they rent out to hunters. “We have the old farmhouse and a log cabin that we just added a bathhouse to,” said McQueen. The Preserve also has many trails for the public to use and groups can tour the bogs throughout the year.
“We also have had several students from different universities come to work. It’s really interesting to see some of these kids who have never been in the county before and to see how much they enjoy this area,” McQueen said. They have worked with universities in Illinois, New Hampshire, and have had students from all over the United States and one from abroad.
McQueen told of one student who was intrigued by the county cooking, in particular some ground cherry preserves. “She had never heard of them, and she loved them so much that we sent a jar of them home with her,” he said. The educational aspect of running the Preserves really highlights McQueen’s talents. McQueen gives tours of the Preserves and loves interacting with students from all different backgrounds.
McQueen said that he plans to continue being the Preserves Manager, “as long as my health holds out and as long as they’ll have me.”         

Outstanding students honored at this month’s county commission meeting

By:  Rebecca Herman

Freelance Writer

On Thursday, the Johnson County Commission and Mayor Larry Potter began their monthly meeting by honoring two groups of outstanding students from Johnson County High School and Johnson County Middle School: The JoCo Robotics Team, who won the VEX Tennessee State Championship, and students from the CTE Solar Cart Team, who placed first in all four races at a recent race. These students were given certificates of achievement for exemplary representation of Johnson County.  “We are very proud of these students and this is just a glimpse of what’s going on in the school system,” said Director of Schools, Dr. Mischelle Simcox. Commissioner Mike Taylor said that this kind of success comes from “good parents and grandparents who help support these students.”
The commission voted to approve several notaries: Tina Fay Arnold, James R. Grayson, Erin Sue Miller, Anita Jean Perry, Sandra Arnold Snyder, and Leticia Marie Thomason.
The commission then voted to approve a resolution for the library building fund, which needs additional space. The resolution is supported by the Town of Mountain City and both the county and the Town of Mountain City will commit matching funds in the amount of $5,000.
The commission also voted to approve a litter grant resolution, which allows for Mayor Potter to apply for a Litter and Trash Collecting Grant for 2017-2018 from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.
Jerry Jordan spoke to the commission about updating the 911 map on a road in order to keep the address the same of a homeowner that lives on the road. The first half-mile will Mountain Lake Road and the second half of the road (one mile) will be Deer Path Circle. Only a couple of signs will be moved and the county road list will be updated to reflect the change.
Al Gryder addressed the commission about animal control in the county. Gryder wanted to know why he had not received a response from the letter he had given the commission in December in which he requested guidelines for citizens in how to deal with strays and animals at large. Perry Stout, county attorney, explained that there are liability issues with having animal control that is run by the county. He explained that the surrounding counties that have animal control are getting money from other sources in order to avoid financial responsibilities. Stout said that people should just continue what they are already doing, as far as reporting these cases. “We have spots at the animal shelter,” he said.
The final item discussed dealt with the sudden departure of Southwest, the company that hauls solid waste from the Johnson County Transfer Station to the Bristol landfill. Mayor Potter announced that as of April 1, Johnson County would no longer have a way to get the solid waste transported to Bristol if they were not able to quickly find a replacement. He explained that an advertisement had already been placed in the Tomahawk and that he needed approval to contract negotiations with the person/group who offers the lowest bid. The commission approved this request.
The next meeting will be on Thursday, April 20 at 7pm.

David Phelps to be featured in West Jefferson on April 1st

The unmistakable sound of multi-Dove and Grammy Award-winning recording artist, David Phelps  will be featured in West Jefferson, NC, on Saturday, April 1, at the Ashe County High School. This exciting concert event begins at 7:00pm.

Once a childhood musical prodigy from Tomball, TX, David Phelps earned a bachelor’s degree in music from Baylor University. Since then, he has become a nationally celebrated vocalist, whose gifts and talents are matched by none. Perhaps best known as the powerful tenor for the multiple Grammy and Dove Award-winning Gaither Vocal Band, Phelps is constantly building on a career that has already been groundbreaking. Emerging as a leading voice in contemporary Christian music, Phelps has been winning the hearts of audiences all over the world for more than two decades. He has performed at numerous prestigious venues across the globe, including the White House, New York’s Carnegie Hall and the Sydney Opera House in Australia. With 14 solo albums to his credit, David’s electrifying voice has moved audiences from all walks of life, crossing generational and stylistic barriers.

This event, presented by Carpenter’s Son Productions and hosted by Midway Baptist Church, featuring David Phelps, will also include talented female vocalist, Charlotte Ritchie, as well as Phelps’ seven-piece musical entourage. Many of the songs featured during this exciting evening are included on Phelps’ recently release Freedom recording.

Any music lover, regardless of stylistic preference, will not want to miss this special evening of worship and community celebration. Make plans now to be a part of this special event with David Phelps on Saturday, April 1 in West Jefferson, NC, at the Ashe County High School.  Ticket information may be obtained about this event by calling 270-627-0570 or visiting www.phelpstickets.com.

Upcoming area blood drives

Blood Assurance Regional Blood Center will conduct public blood drives at the following locations:

  • Thursday, March 16, 10:00a-5:00p, ACT-Fairview, Johnson City, TN (Day 1)
  • Thursday, March 16, 1:00p-5:00p, Smyth County Community Hospital, Marion, VA
  • Friday, March 17th, 9:00a-4:00p, ACT-Fairview, Johnson City, TN (Day 2)
  • Friday, March 17th, 10:00a-3:00p, Smyth County Administrative Offices, Marion, VA
  • Monday, March 20th, 10:00a-4:00p, Mel Leaman Free Clinic, Marion, VA (Day 1)
  • Tuesday, March 21st, 11:00a-4:00p, Northeast State Community College, Elizabethton, TN
  • Tuesday, March 21st, 10:00a-4:00p, Mel Leaman Free Clinic, Marion, VA (Day 2)
  • Wednesday, March 22nd, 7:30a-2:30p, Science Hill High School, Johnson City, TN
  • Thursday, March 23rd, 9:00a-12:15p, MSHA Information Systems, Johnson City, TN
  • Thursday, March 23rd, 2:00p-4:00p, MSHA Accounting & Payroll, Johnson City, TN
  • Friday, March 24th, 10:00a-3:00p, Valley Health Care, Chilhowie, VA
  • Friday, March 24th, 11:00a-3:00p, Walmart Supercenter, W. Market Street, Johnson City, TN

Donors also welcome at Blood Assurance Donor Centers:

  • 16000 Johnston Memorial Dr., Medical Suite 110, Abingdon, VA
  • 100 Linden Square Dr., Bristol, VA
  • 1 Professional Park Drive, Suite 14, Johnson City, TN
  • 300 Clinchfield St., Kingsport, TN

Donors must be at least 18 years old (16-17 years old with parental consent), weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health. The process usually takes about 30 minutes and includes a complimentary gift and snacks. Donors should eat a healthy meal and drink plenty of fluids -avoiding caffeine- prior to giving blood.

To schedule a blood drive at a local business, school, church or civic/community organization, please contact:

In Tennessee, Mike Patterson, 423-298-4335, MikePatterson@bloodassurance.org

In Virginia, Anne-Lewis Vowell, 423-635-3441, Anne-LewisVowell@bloodassurance.org

Public Invited to Join in Conversation about an Inclusive ETSU

JOHNSON CITY – “A Community Conversation on . . . an Inclusive ETSU” will be held at the Gray Fossil Site Conference Center Building, 1212 Suncrest Drive, in Gray on March 30 from 4 to 6 p.m. The session will explore possible pathways for expanding access to the ETSU campus for students with disabilities.

“There has been a movement for young people with intellectual disabilities to be able to participate in gaining the college experience,” says Julie Sears, Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities for East Tennessee Coordinator and adjunct instructor at ETSU. “The ETSU College of Education has been funded with a small grant to begin conversations about how we would overcome the barriers in our community to support these young adults as they become members of our college community.”

Dr. Cynthia Chambers and Dr. Pamela Mims of the Clemmer College of Education faculty at ETSU are looking for active community participants to come together to discuss the many options on how students with disabilities can be supported.

According to Chambers and Mims, “Today, many young adults with intellectual disabilities and their families are expecting more. Students are leaving high school in search of meaningful careers, rich relationships, community experiences, and a college education. We will discuss how we might support these students on our campus and what those programs and services might look like.”

For more information or to register, visit www.inclusiveetsu.splashthat.com.  For disability accommodations, call the ETSU Office of Disability Services at 423-439-8346.

Johnson County Middle School Robotics team presents their winning program demonstration to school board

By Rebecca Herman

The Johnson County School Board met for their monthly meeting on Thursday, March 9 with all board members present. Kevin Long, chairman of the board, welcomed two school board members from Carter and Unicoi County who were present to take notes to send to the Tennessee School Board Association (TBSA), in order to stay in good standing with the association.
The board began the meeting by honoring the employee of the month, who was chosen from Johnson County High School (JCHS). Barbara Hensley, custodian, “is our most tenured custodian. She takes her job very seriously and works hard to make sure that our building is in great shape…she feels like a mother hen to us all,” said Lisa Throop, principal at Johnson County High School.
Also recognized at the board meeting were seniors who have earned an ACT score of 30 or higher; 36 is the highest a student can achieve. Those recognized were Carlyn Eggers, Nick Whitener, Spencer Stanley, Corina Ward, Kris Artidiello, and Brianne Ward.
Next, the JoCo Robotics team was asked to present to the board. The team had just competed in the VEX state competition, where one of the teams placed first and will now be competing at the VEX World Competition, which will take place in Louisville, Kentucky in April. The winning team demonstrated how the robots work and showed a video of their year, filled with pictures of the team building and competing. Susan Quave, Johnson County Middle School (JCMS) science teacher and robotics coach, expressed her pride in the students and explained that the students worked hours after school and even on snow days in order to complete the work on the robots and the notebooks. “They didn’t just go in and take them by storm, they have been working hard all year long,” said Dr. Brenda Eggers, technology teacher at JCMS and robotics coach. Edna Miller, principal at JCMS, also announced Quave had been awarded VEX Partner of the Year.
Dr. Cheri Long, principal at Roan Creek Elementary (RCE), Carol Hieronymus, special education teacher at RCE, and Norma Sutherland, special education assistant, brought a slideshow and examples of items that are used in the Sensory Room at RCE. This room is used for students who have sensory process disorders and features different kinds of therapy tools that can be used in a safe and loving atmosphere. The room features soft lighting, a ball pit, a LED bubble machine, relaxation tactical wall, shiny string, crash mat, and handheld toys and books that are beneficial to children with sensory processing disorders. Sutherland explained “the first student I took into the room looked up and said, ‘it’s a gift from Heaven,’ so we know that it’s working.” Board member Mike Payne asked if this kind of room could be used in other schools and Paula Norton, Supervisor of Special Education, explained that every school has elements of the sensory room, they just don’t all have the space to put in a room. She also explained that there are a number of students who live outside the Roan Creek district who attend RCE because their needs are better met at RCE.
Charlie Jennings, from the Johnson County Youth Football League, addressed the board for permission to use the football field at JCHS for this upcoming season. The request was approved.
Mountain City Mayor Kevin Parsons spoke to the board next. Parsons explained that work would not begin on a bridge that needs to be replaced on school grounds until this summer, and that the work may not be completed when school begins in the fall. He also explained that a student has approached him to paint a mural in the tunnel at Ralph Stout Park in hopes of deterring vandalism. Finally, Parsons gave the board a resolution that has been sent to the state opposing any voucher programs that would allow private schools in Mountain City.
Student school board member, Marly Eggers informed the board that David South’s class built a solar go-kart and took the kart to a competition where they placed first in all four races. Important dates for JCHS are as follows: ACT will take place on March 21; Freshman Orientation will also be on March 21; FFA Alumni meeting will be on March 16 at the Aquacenter; National Honor Society Induction will be April 3; and FFA State Competition will be March 26-29. “At the convention, they will be receiving the Superior Chapter Award. Phillip Dugger, Taylor Long, and Austin Gentry will be receiving their State FFA degree. Rebekah Dugger will be serving on the Nominating Committee…Taylor Long was named the East Tennessee Star in Agribusiness. She will be going through interviews and going on stage to compete for the state title,” said Eggers.
Dr. Mischelle Simcox, Director of Schools, said that eight snow days have been used and that the next break would be April 14-17 for the Good Friday and Easter holiday. All board members ended the meeting expressing their pride for all the students, staff, and faculty of Johnson County School System. Board member Kenneth Gregg, said that, “it is an honor being a Johnson County board member, there are so many positive things coming out of Johnson County.”
The next school board meeting will be April 13 at 6 pm.

City Council tables Farmers’ Market request for move to Ralph Stout Park

By Bonnie Davis Guy

The Mountain City, March Council Meeting came to session with Mayor Kevin Parsons and all aldermen in attendance. The town hall was packed to capacity with many there to show support for a presentation to the council from the Farmers Market manager and board.
First up was a request for permission to use the city’s ball fields for the 2017 little league season. Additionally, if the council approves there will be an opening day parade with the tentative date of April 1. The league president also mentioned they had installed a new score board at Cunningham Park and would like to move the old score board to the t-ball field. They would also like to work with the city to get all the score boards in operating order. The request was passed. “We want to help you in anyway,” said Mayor Parsons. “We take pride in our leagues. The Johnson County Little League is doing a great job.”
Next was an all yes roll call vote of the consent calendar including last month’s minutes and the second and final reading of budget amendment ordinances number 1531- number 1538.
Council member comments are next on the agenda beginning with Alderman Bob Morrison who said “Thank you to all the city employees, we appreciate you all.” He further added he had seen an increase in folks using the Goose Creek Trail and is feeling good about the project. The other aldermen reiterated thanks to the city employees but had no other business.
Mayor Parsons stated free dental care will possibly be coming to Mountain City for a two-day period later this year. Details are being worked out but hopefully this service will be helpful to many people in need. Parsons also stated that the use of govdeals.com to list surplus city property was going well and he encouraged all department heads to get all surplus items together and place them on the board.
Mayor Parsons then presented the aldermen with a resolution that stated Mountain City would not support a voucher based education program. The Johnson County School Board had approached Mayor Parsons about possible support for such a resolution and once discussed it was unanimously approved by the council.
City Recorder Sheila Shaw recently received an email from the art teacher at Johnson County High School seeking approval for her students to paint a mural in the Ralph Stout Park tunnel. Although the alderman expressed concern that the students’ work would be vandalized, they welcomed the opportunity to have the mural. Shaw informed the council the bid date for the Fairground Lane Bridge had been pushed forward to June 23. The mayor and all aldermen were concerned over this delay interfering with the traffic flow at the start of the 2017 school year but due to TDOT regulation, the project must move forward.
City Police Chief Denver Church presented a list of city structure and property ordinance violations to the council. A letter of warning will be issued and followed up on. Mayor Parsons thanked Chief Denver Church and his department for compiling the list and said in his research he found that Kingsport utilizes their fire chief in determining structural safety violations and going forward Chief Stout would be helping with the process.  Church also discussed the possibility of a city K-9 unit being put in place. City Officer T.J .Brown and his canine would be spear heading this effort and presented the facts to the council. Brown stated if the city were to start from scratch in obtaining a K-9 and all equipment plus training it would cost around $1,700 however, Brown is offering to donate his K-9 and equipment to the city. The city would be responsible for training in Chattanooga and some various other small items. Officer Brown explained that in the past year alone the department seizures from drugs had nearly doubled. Many times, officers could not search because probable cause was not clear. However, if the K-9 alerted, that constituted probable cause and could give the city an advantage they didn’t currently have in their efforts to fight the drug epidemic facing the area. An all yes roll call vote was given.
Chris Hook was next to speak and he told the council that there was yet another bridge that could possibly be affected by the TDOT water line/ right of way issue. He asked permission to draw down on the city’s engineer before moving forward. Approval was given.
Gary Phillips was once again approached regarding the lease of city property for grazing horses. The individual interested is not only willing to pay, sign a lease but also a hold harmless agreement. Per Mayor Parsons, city attorney McEwen will look into the situation and a decision will be based on his findings. Phillips also reports that the city pool pump is in good working order but the pool will need new tiles and skimmers. The pool also needs to be replumbed before opening for the season.
New business was next on the agenda starting with a discussion from Adam Williams of Brushy Fork Environmental concerning a cost share agreement to address the drainage issues on Adams Road and Collins Drive. The grant would be a 50/50 split with the city cost being no more than $75,000. However, with the installation of the grades, French drains and other improvements both the residents of the area and the overall creek quality would improve. After tabling the vote to the end of the meeting to give members time to consider the plan, an all yes roll call vote was ultimately taken.
Most the crowd at the meeting consisted of supporters of the request to allow the farmers market to relocate and operate in Ralph Stout Park. Jana Jones, market manager, submitted a proposal for the council to consider including the building of a multipurpose facility at the park. Jones also introduced the new president and director of special projects and explained their roles in the proposed project. Jones went on to issue a blanket apology for any offenses caused by the market toward the council and community in the past. Jones stated any property they consider must contain five major elements, parking, visibility, accessibility, bathrooms and growth potential.
Upon completion of her presentation Jones answered questions from the council members. For the rest of the story, pick up a copy of this week’s Tomahawk on sale now.

Upcoming area blood drives

Blood Assurance Regional Blood Center will conduct public blood drives at the following locations:

  • Friday, March 10, 9:30a-2:00p, Ferguson, Johnson City, TN
  • Friday, March 10, 12:00p-3:45p, Highlands Union Bank, Abingdon, VA
  • Monday, March 13, 9:00a-11:00am Grace Health Care, Abingdon, VA
  • Monday, March 13, 1:00p-3:30p, Food City, Abingdon, VA
  • Tuesday, March 14, 8:30a-3:00p, Galax High School, Galax, VA
  • Tuesday, March 14, 8:30a-1:30p, Unaka Elementary, Elizabethton, TN
  • Wednesday, March 15, 9:30a-4:00p, Johnson City Medical Center, Johnson City, TN
  • Thursday, March 16, 10:00a-5:00p, ACT-Fairview, Johnson City, TN
  • Thursday, March 16, 1:00p-5:00p, Smyth County Community Hospital, Marion, VA
  • Friday, March 17th, 9:00a-4:00p, ACT-Fairview, Johnson City, TN
  • Friday, March 17th, 10:00a-3:00p, Smyth County Administrative Offices, Marion, VA

Donors also welcome at Blood Assurance Donor Centers:

  • 16000 Johnston Memorial Dr., Medical Suite 110, Abingdon, VA
  • 100 Linden Square Dr., Bristol, VA
  • 1 Professional Park Drive, Suite 14, Johnson City, TN
  • 300 Clinchfield St., Kingsport, TN

Donors must be at least 18 years old (16-17 years old with parental consent), weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health. The process usually takes about 30 minutes and includes a complimentary gift and snacks. Donors should eat a healthy meal and drink plenty of fluids -avoiding caffeine- prior to giving blood.

To schedule a blood drive at a local business, school, church or civic/community organization, please contact:

In Tennessee, Mike Patterson, 423-298-4335, MikePatterson@bloodassurance.org

In Virginia, Anne-Lewis Vowell, 423-635-3441, Anne-LewisVowell@bloodassurance.org

Area blood drives

The recent surge of flu, norovirus, upper respiratory infections and other illness has had a negative impact on local blood collections. We urge all healthy individuals who can donate to come to one of our centers or mobile blood drives shown below. For additional opportunities to give please visit www.bloodassurance.org to schedule an appointment today.

Blood Assurance Regional Blood Center will conduct public blood drives at the following locations:

  • Friday, March 3, 10:45a-3:30p, Johnson City Honda, Johnson City, TN
  • Monday, March 6, 8:00a-2:00p, Sulphur Springs Elementary School, Jonesborough, TN
  • Tuesday, March 7, 11:00a-1:30p, MSHA Home Health & Hospice, Johnson City, TN
  • Tuesday, March 7, 3:30p-7:30p, West View Elementary, Limestone, TN
  • Wednesday, March 8, 10:00a-5:00p, ACT-Boones Creek, Johnson City, TN
  • Thursday, March 9, 10:00a-5:00p, ACT-Boones Creek, Johnson City, TN
  • Friday, March 10, 9:30a-2:00p, Ferguson, Johnson City, TN

Donors also welcome at Blood Assurance Donor Centers:

  • 16000 Johnston Memorial Dr., Medical Suite 110, Abingdon, VA
  • 100 Linden Square Dr., Bristol, VA
  • 1 Professional Park Drive, Suite 14, Johnson City, TN
  • 300 Clinchfield St., Kingsport, TN

Donors must be at least 18 years old (16-17 years old with parental consent), weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health. The process usually takes about 30 minutes and includes a complimentary gift and snacks. Donors should eat a healthy meal and drink plenty of fluids -avoiding caffeine- prior to giving blood.

To schedule a blood drive at a local business, school, church or civic/community organization, please contact:

In Tennessee, Mike Patterson, 423-298-4335, MikePatterson@bloodassurance.org

In Virginia, Anne-Lewis Vowell, 423-635-3441, Anne-LewisVowell@bloodassurance.org

Roe to hold staff office hours in Johnson County

MOUNTAIN CITY, TENN  – Rep. Phil Roe, M.D. (R-TN) announced he will send staff to hold office hours in Mountain City on Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at the Johnson County Courthouse from 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Roe’s staff will be available to assist First District constituents.
Some of the ways that Roe’s district offices can be of assistance:

  • Senior Citizens: Social Security and disability
  • Students: financial aid, entrance to U.S. Service Academies
  • Veterans: VA claims and military service problems
  • Small Business: SBA loan applications, technical assistance and interpretation of federal regulations
  • Home Buyers: FMHA, FHA, and VA home loan application problems
  • Local Governments: disaster assistance, regulation compliance, and federal grant application problems
  • Taxpayers: IRS tax problems

United Central Organizes Blood Drive to Show Support of Employees and Their Families

BRISTOL, Tennessee – United Central Industrial Supply, a wholly owned subsidiary of The United Distribution Group, a distributor of consumable supplies, and other value added services, is hosting a blood drive on February 28 from 9 AM – 3 PM in the parking lot of 1241 Volunteer Parkway, Suite 1000 in Bristol, Tennessee.
This blood drive is in support of a longtime employee, David Miller, whose young niece, Ellee Large of Abingdon Virginia, is undergoing treatment for leukemia through St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. Blood Assurance will be coordinating the blood drive for United Central.
Henry Looney, President of United Central stated “United Central is a family and when we can help and support each other, we are proud to do so. We are excited to work with Blood Assurance to coordinate donations to support the Niswonger Children’s Hospital and ten other hospitals in our region.”
To donate, donors do not need to know their blood type, but they do need to bring a photo ID. Additionally, while appointments are not necessary, they are encouraged as they take priority over walk-ins. Appointments can be coordinated with Amber Morris of United Central by calling (423) 573-7306 or emailing her at amber.morris@udginc.com.

Upcoming area blood drives

The recent surge of flu, norovirus, upper respiratory infections and other illness has had a negative impact on local blood collections. We urge all healthy individuals who can donate to come to one of our centers or mobile blood drives shown below. For additional opportunities to give please visit www.bloodassurance.org to schedule an appointment today.

 

Blood Assurance Regional Blood Center will conduct public blood drives at the following locations:

  • Thursday, February 23, 10:00a-5:00p, Milligan College, Milligan College, TN
  • Friday, February 24, 8:30a-3:00p, Towne Acres Elementary School, Johnson City, TN
  • Friday, February 24, 11:15a-3:30p, First Bank and Trust, Abingdon, VA
  • Monday, February 27, 8:30a-4:00p, Jonesborough Elementary and Middle Schools, Jonesborough, TN
  • Tuesday, February 28, 9:00a-3:00p, Ellee Large Honorary Blood Drive at United Central Industrial Supply, 1241 Volunteer Pkwy, Suite 1000, Bristol, TN
  • Wednesday, March 1, 9:00a-4:00p, North Side Elementary School, Johnson City, TN
  • Wednesday, March 1, 10:00a-3:00p, Primary Care Center, Abingdon, VA
  • Thursday, March 2, 5:30a-11:00a, Mullican Flooring, Johnson City, TN
  • Thursday, March 2, 9:30a-11:15a, Blue Ridge Home Health Care, Galax, VA
  • Friday, March 3, 9:00a-3:00p, Little Milligan Elementary School, Butler, TN

Donors also welcome at Blood Assurance Donor Centers:

  • 16000 Johnston Memorial Dr., Medical Suite 110, Abingdon, VA
  • 100 Linden Square Dr., Bristol, VA
  • 1 Professional Park Drive, Suite 14, Johnson City, TN
  • 300 Clinchfield St., Kingsport, TN

Donors must be at least 18 years old (16-17 years old with parental consent), weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health. The process usually takes about 30 minutes and includes a complimentary gift and snacks. Donors should eat a healthy meal and drink plenty of fluids -avoiding caffeine- prior to giving blood.

To schedule a blood drive at a local business, school, church or civic/community organization, please contact:

In Tennessee, Mike Patterson, 423-298-4335, MikePatterson@bloodassurance.org

In Virginia, Anne-Lewis Vowell, 423-635-3441, Anne-LewisVowell@bloodassurance.org

Johnson County Middle School hosts robotics state qualifier; local high school named as tournament champion

By Rebecca Herman

On Saturday, February 18 Johnson County Middle School hosted the JOCO VEX “Winter Wonderland” State Qualifier, which was sponsored by TVA, Tennessee Valley Authority. Sixteen teams from eight schools came to compete with the hopes of qualifying for the state Robotics competition. Middle and high school teams came from across the state, with Memphis traveling the longest distance.
The schools who competed were: Johnson County Middle School and Johnson County High School, Mountain City, TN; Brentwood Academy, Brentwood, TN; Sullivan North High School, Kingsport, TN; Happy Valley Middle School, Elizabethton, TN; Holston and Innovation Academy Middle School, Blountville, TN; Jefferson County High School, Dandridge, TN; and St. George’s Independent School, Collierville, TN.
The competition was well received by everyone in attendance. For many parents, this was the first time seeing their child competing because the competitions are usually held in middle and west Tennessee. This event is a first for Johnson County and will “be a yearly state qualifier event,” according to JCMS team sponsor and teacher, Susan Quave. So far, this is the first state qualifier for East Tennessee.
Teams have multiple opportunities to gain points: skills notebook, robot skills challenge, and programming skills challenge. Rich Miller, state judge, spoke to the group of students before the competition began and expressed his excitement that, “every team today completed the skills notebook!” Miller explained that completing these notebooks will help students learn the skills necessary for any career in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) field.
The students began the day with qualifying matches where teams compete against one another. Each event began with the programming skills challenge, where each team pre-programs their robot to run the course in order to gain as many points as possible in 15 seconds. From there the robots began the next challenge where the team members use remotes to move their robots to gain points in order to clear their assigned space. The space is filled with two “bags” and multiple “stars.” Depending on where the items were moved determined the number of points each team received. The goal was to move as many “bags” and “stars” into your opponents’ space before time was called.
The alliances were picked and the elimination matches began after lunch.  These newly formed teams then competed against other alliances. Brentwood Academy received the Excellence Award, which qualified them for State and Regional Championship and CREATE U.S. Open; Tournament Champions were Brentwood Academy and Johnson County High School, which qualified them for State and Regional Championship and CREATE U.S. Open; the Build Award went to Jefferson County High School; the Design Award went to St. George’s Independent School; Judge’s Award went to Brentwood Academy; Robot Skills Award, which qualifies for CREATE U.S. Open, went to Brentwood Academy; and the Sportsmanship Award, which was chosen by the students, went to Johnson County Middle School.
After this event, JCMS and JCHS, have three out of their four teams that have qualified for the State Championship, which will take place on March 4 in Brentwood, TN.  Schools that place at the State level will then compete at the World Championship, which this year takes place in Louisville, Kentucky.

Watauga Lake accessibility and Sink Mountain boat ramp discussed by local officials

By Marlana Ward

Lake accessibility was the topic of the evening when representatives from the National Forest Service, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA), and members of the Johnson County Commission met together February 9, 2017. The popular Sink Mountain boat ramp, the need for repairs, and possible site enhancement were the main focuses of the meeting.
Johnson County Mayor Larry Potter opened the meeting by expressing his desire to see the ramp moved further up the access road to allow room for a fishing pier to be added to the lake access point. He explained that though he knew water flow in that portion of the lake could be an issue, he hoped that a solution could be found to make the lake more accessible to more people. He also mentioned that giving emergency personnel a better launching point would be very beneficial to the county.
US Forest Service Ranger, Keith Kelley, addressed those gathered to say that while he was relatively new to the Johnson County area, he was interested in learning more about any issues with the Forest Service properties in the county and the history thereof. Kelley also brought attention to the fact that the water in the Watauga Reservoir belonged to the Tennessee Valley Authority and any work done on the water would have to be approved by that agency as well.
Representing the local sportsmen of the county, Commissioner Jimmy Lowe spoke of the continuing deterioration of the Sink Mountain Ramp and the need for maintenance. He explained how the gravel between the concrete portions of the ramp has been steadily washed away over the years and the need to have the ramp re-bedded was something that needed to be addressed soon. Ranger Kelley acknowledged the concern for the needed repair and assured that it would be looked into soon. He said that a repair of that nature to an already existing fixture should not need approval from multiple agencies and would be something that could be taken care of easily.
Commissioner Lowe, as well as Commissioner Rick Snyder, both expressed a desire to see a floating dock system installed at the Sink Mountain location. The increased ability to single-handedly launch a boat as well as a less-damaging method of launching could be achieved by having a dock system that lowered and raised with the water level and give boaters a way to secure their boat in the water during launch and loading without having to drag their boats across the graveled shore.
For the rest of the story, pick up a copy of this week’s Tomahawk on sale now.

Johnson County Middle School hosts robotics state qualifier; local high school named as tournament champion

By Rebecca Herman

On Saturday, February 18 Johnson County Middle School hosted the JOCO VEX “Winter Wonderland” State Qualifier, which was sponsored by TVA, Tennessee Valley Authority. Sixteen teams from eight schools came to compete with the hopes of qualifying for the state Robotics competition. Middle and high school teams came from across the state, with Memphis traveling the longest distance.
The schools who competed were: Johnson County Middle School and Johnson County High School, Mountain City, TN; Brentwood Academy, Brentwood, TN; Sullivan North High School, Kingsport, TN; Happy Valley Middle School, Elizabethton, TN; Holston and Innovation Academy Middle School, Blountville, TN; Jefferson County High School, Dandridge, TN; and St. George’s Independent School, Collierville, TN.
The competition was well received by everyone in attendance. For many parents, this was the first time seeing their child competing because the competitions are usually held in middle and west Tennessee. This event is a first for Johnson County and will “be a yearly state qualifier event,” according to JCMS team sponsor and teacher, Susan Quave. So far, this is the first state qualifier for East Tennessee.
Teams have multiple opportunities to gain points: skills notebook, robot skills challenge, and programming skills challenge. Rich Miller, state judge, spoke to the group of students before the competition began and expressed his excitement that, “every team today completed the skills notebook!” Miller explained that completing these notebooks will help students learn the skills necessary for any career in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) field.
The students began the day with qualifying matches where teams compete against one another. Each event began with the programming skills challenge, where each team pre-programs their robot to run the course in order to gain as many points as possible in 15 seconds. From there the robots began the next challenge where the team members use remotes to move their robots to gain points in order to clear their assigned space. The space is filled with two “bags” and multiple “stars.” Depending on where the items were moved determined the number of points each team received. The goal was to move as many “bags” and “stars” into your opponents’ space before time was called.
The alliances were picked and the elimination matches began after lunch.  These newly formed teams then competed against other alliances. Brentwood Academy received the Excellence Award, which qualified them for State and Regional Championship and CREATE U.S. Open; Tournament Champions were Brentwood Academy and Johnson County High School, which qualified them for State and Regional Championship and CREATE U.S. Open; the Build Award went to Jefferson County High School; the Design Award went to St. George’s Independent School; Judge’s Award went to Brentwood Academy; Robot Skills Award, which qualifies for CREATE U.S. Open, went to Brentwood Academy; and the Sportsmanship Award, which was chosen by the students, went to Johnson County Middle School.
After this event, JCMS and JCHS, have three out of their four teams that have qualified for the State Championship, which will take place on March 4 in Brentwood, TN.  Schools that place at the State level will then compete at the World Championship, which this year takes place in Louisville, Kentucky.

Johnson County Health Department recognized by Tennessee for performance excellence

The Johnson County Health Department has earned Interest Level Recognition in the annual Excellence in Tennessee recognition program administered by the Tennessee Center for Performance Excellence (TNCPE). TNCPE is Tennessee’s only statewide quality program and is patterned on the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, the national standard for recognizing role model performance through innovation, improvement, and visionary leadership. The Johnson County Health Department will accept the award at the 24th Annual Excellence in Tennessee Awards Banquet on March 2, 2017, at the Franklin Marriott Cool Springs.
“The Johnson County Health Department, led by County Director Caroline Hurt, is actively and eagerly embracing this continuous process of improvement in carrying out our collective Mission,” said Regional Director Rebekah English, Northeast Regional Health Office.
The Johnson County Health Department provides clinical-based and population-based public health services to residents in and around Johnson County, Tennessee.
Through an annual evaluation and assessment process, TNCPE recognizes high-performing organizations that demonstrate continuous improvement and role model processes. This year, TNCPE has named 42 organizations as 2016 Award winners that represent outstanding achievement in the following industry sectors: health care, manufacturing, service, education, government, and nonprofit.
“This award represents hard work, focus, and a dedication to performance improvement,” Gov. Bill Haslam said. “The Johnson County Health Department’s efforts to improve its processes will go beyond the walls of the organization’s workplace to touch lives throughout Tennessee.”
Organizations like the Johnson County Health Department apply to the TNCPE program at one of four levels. As the levels increase, so does the depth and complexity of the application, which is based on the Baldrige Excellence Framework. Since the program was founded in 1993, only 23 organizations have attained the excellence designation. One will receive the Excellence Award this year; two organizations will be honored with the Achievement Award; thirteen will receive a Commitment Award; and 26 will receive Interest Recognition.
“This program helps organizations look at the big picture and continuously strive to implement the best practices in their industry,” said TNCPE President Katie Rawls. “But it’s not easy—organizations like the Johnson County Health Department are truly passionate about performance excellence and have chosen TNCPE and the Baldrige framework to help them become the best they can be.”
A full list of winners can be found on the TNCPE website www.tncpe.org.
Established in 1993 as a public-private partnership, the Tennessee Center for Performance Excellence strives to promote economic development and drive organizational excellence by helping companies and organizations grow more competitive in today’s global marketplace through affordable, in-depth assessments. A statewide nonprofit, TNCPE is grounded in the Baldrige Excellence Framework—a holistic framework used by organizations across multiple industries to improve their performance and achieve sustainable results. More than 1,300 organizations have participated in and benefited from the TNCPE program. Four Tennessee businesses—Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation, Pal’s Sudden Service, Eastman Chemical Company, and Federal Express—have been honored with both the prestigious Baldrige National Quality Award and the TNCPE Excellence Award.
For more information about the Tennessee Center for Performance Excellence, contact Katie Rawls, president and CEO, at katie.rawls@tncpe.org.
For more information on the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, visit www.nist.gov/baldrige.
For more information on Johnson County Health Department, contact Caroline Hurt at caroline.hurt@tn.gov.

Johnson County to name bridge in memory of World War II veteran Rubin Stout

By Rebecca Herman

The Johnson County Commission met on February 16 for their monthly meeting; all commissioners were present. The meeting began with public comments.
First to address the commission was Roby Phillippi, who asked the commissioners to consider changing the wildlife baiting regulations due to the overpopulation of wildlife in the county. Phillippi and many other hunters in the county would like to be able to put out bait year round and many states have already passed laws that allows baiting of wildlife year round. County attorney Perry Stout explained that there are state laws that are in place that would not allow the county to make such a decision. Mayor Larry Potter suggested Stout look into the law and said that the county may be able to send in a resolution to ask the state to change the law. Stout stressed that the law is strict and the punishment for breaking said law is harsh; one could lose his license to hunt, guns, etc.
Jerry Jordan addressed the commission asking for them to approve road name changes in Shady Valley and Mountain City due to new residents who need addresses. They voted to add “Lane” on to a road that has been called “Barry Blevins,” which is located off Winchester Road and to merge a small section of Walts Road with Hubert Taylor Road. These changes will be added to the county road list. The commission approved this request.
Next to speak were Ken Wiley and Dr. John Payne who requested the commission to consider dedicating a county bridge in memory of Rubin Stout, a Johnson County native and veteran of the United States Army. Stout was a World War II veteran who had an exciting military career that sent him across the globe. The commissioners voted to approve the request and chose to name a bridge in the Pandora community after Stout.
Russell Robinson asked for the approval of budget amendments. Russell explained that money was moved to pay for new school buses and an educational program which the Johnson County School Board voted on the week before. The commission approved this amendment.
Sheriff Mike Reece asked the commission to approve the auction of a 2007 Chevy Impala that is listed under the sheriff’s department surplus equipment. The commission approved this request.
Perry Stout reported speaking with State Representative Timothy Hill about concerns that the county has about inmate issues. Stout said, “They know the problems…they didn’t realize some of the issues, so it was educational.” He also explained that it makes a difference when the commissioners call the state representatives and officials.
Mike Taylor invited everyone out to the JAM Jamboree and silent auction on April 18 at Heritage Hall. JAM has 75 kids, who are learning and playing old timey music. This program continues to grow each year and would greatly benefit from community support.
The next commission meeting will be March 16 at 7pm.

Red Cross offers services to help with disaster preparedness plans in Johnson County

By Bonnie Davis Guy

The February Mountain City Council meeting came to order promptly with Mayor Kevin Parsons, Vice Mayor Jerry Jordan, and Aldermen Kenny Icenhour and Bob Morrison in attendance. Alderman Bud Crosswhite was absent due to illness. With the council having a quorum, they moved forward with the night’s agenda beginning with public presentations.
First to address the council members was Ellen Watkins from the Johnson County branch of the American Red Cross. Watkins wanted to update the council members on the county’s response to the recent catastrophic wildfires in Sevier County/Gatlinburg as well as other events affecting our area. Watkins was called to Gatlinburg the first night of the fire and helped find shelter and assistance for some 14,000 people. On Christmas Eve 2016, the shelters were finally closed with everyone placed in housing. Watkins, a long-term veteran of the Red Cross, visibly teared up when she reported, “It is unreal how the people of Tennessee stepped up to the plate with donations of needed items, clothing and financial aid. I am so proud,” said Watkins. The audience responded with congratulations and comments acknowledging Tennessee is the volunteer state.  Watkins went on to explain to the board that she would like to see residences and businesses of Johnson County have disaster preparedness plans in place. The Red Cross, and specifically Watkins, is available to help create these plans if needed. Johnson County recently suffered a microburst weather event, which is a type of tornado/straight line wind scenario. Our area is susceptible to severe weather and natural events that can end in disaster situations. Being prepared can make all the difference.  Mayor Parsons thanked Watkins and said, “I am proud to have you as a citizen of our town.”
The next item involved a landowner acquiring an unused right of way to 365 Hillside Drive across from Apple Street. The landowner is interested in developing this property but the entrance would encroach on the city’s right of way. Attorney Steve McEwen will investigate the issue, as the council had no objections at this point. A motion was made and passed to give Mayor Parsons and Attorney McEwen the authority to move forward with this request.
Chris Dunbar, Johnson Counties Middle School teacher and coach for the JV baseball team, asked permission to use the city’s ball field as a practice field starting on February 13 through March 31. With an all yes vote, permission was given.
The consent calendar with January minutes and the second and final reading of budget amendments were unanimously approved.
Items of concern for the council members and department heads began with Vice Mayor Jordan who thanked the city workers for the hard work at trying to cover up the graffiti at Ralph Stout Park. He also asked Andy Garland for a time frame on rehabbing the reservoir at water tank hill. Garland responded that the project will begin as soon as the weather permits and equipment can get to the site. Jordan also had concerns about buildings and property in the city that are not up to city ordinance due to disrepair or junk around the property. According to Jordan, he thinks it is time to enforce the ordinances set forth by the city council.
Alderman Bob Morrison wanted to express his heartfelt appreciation to all the city’s employees for their dedication and hard work.  Morrison has pictures of the bridge along the Goose Creek Trail at the Johnson County Welcome Center. He reports hearing lots of fears that although the bridge is an over the top design (built so water can rush over top in a high water situation) it will washout or cause water to flood the area below the welcome center or possibly the basement.  He also reminded the council that the Hall Tax decreases were beginning this year. “I am not satisfied with the answers we are receiving concerning the Welcome Center bridge, Parsons said. “We will continue to work on the issue.”
Mayor Parsons was next to speak and was happy to say we would all be seeing advertisements coming out for the Doe Mountain Recreation. V. Tate Davis has been put in place as the executive director, along with Tina Delante as the assistant Director for Doe Mountain Recreation. “I will be glad to see revenue come into the county from Doe Mountain,” Parsons said. He also stated he supported what Vice Mayor Jordan said about upholding the city ordinances on keeping property and buildings up to standard. After a motion was made to uphold the ordinance and start sending out notices a vote was taken and passed unanimously.
Sheila Shaw informed the council that Dry Run Utility District must have a closeout audit per the state. It will be from October 2016 – January 18, 2017.   A budget amendment was asked for and granted with an all yes roll call vote. Shaw also stated that all the Dry Run Utility District customers were being added to the Mountain City system. Ron Murphy from the Dry Run office has stated he is willing to stay on and assist with the switch over until he is no longer needed. The board responded they would like to wrap up the project by the end of February, obtain the records and maps that are necessary and get Dry Run running smoothly.
New business was next on the agenda with the first item being a discussion concerning the Goose Creek Trail time extension and request for additional funds. The funds would be to pay an engineer to be on site until the project was complete. The council stated they were not inclined to grant either the extension or the additional funds. The original contract stated the contractor would have the project completed within 180 days. When that could not be done, they filed for an extension with the state. It was brought to the board’s attention that the crew was not on site working some 30 days out of that 180. Jerry Jordan was firm in saying his vote was for no extension and no more money.  Parsons also stated he was “against additional money” going toward the project.
For the rest of the story, pick up a copy of this week’s Tomahawk on sale now.

Johnson County High School graduation set for May 13

By Rebecca Herman

On Thursday, February 9, the Johnson County School Board met for its regularly scheduled meeting; all board members were present.
Director of Schools Dr. Mischelle Simcox began the meeting by recognizing the employee of the month, Julian Crews, teacher at Johnson County Middle School.  Crews teaches seventh grade social studies and according to JCMS Principal Edna Miller Crews creates “an atmosphere where students desire to explore and inquire…he presents and teaches in such a way that all students want to be actively engaged in the lesson.” Miller also explained that Crews is able to have this impact of students due to his “tireless efforts” and “countless hours preparing lessons that include effective differentiated learning strategies based on the abilities and learning difficulties of students, ensuring that all students are successful in thinking through the task and mastering the objective.”
Miller also recognized students who received the top ten scores on the ACT Aspire test. These students worked hard and earned high scores in at least three of the four subject areas. The students recognized were Samantha Manuel, Lauryn Johnson, Veda Morefield, Lauren Patterson, Christopher Laing, Issac Brown, Nathan Trivette, Christian Woerner, Robert Coffey, and Madison Wright.
Rick Thomason and Danielle Pleasant spoke to the board about the 4-H program and additional programs that are offered to students in the school system. After giving a brief history of the 100-year-old organization, Pleasant and Thomason explained what the program offers the children. Pleasant said that in Johnson County they focus on workforce development. In order to teach students to be responsible citizens, Pleasant works with fourth, fifth, and sixth graders to complete five projects per school year. These projects help students to learn the Parliamentary Procedure, public speaking, financial education, supply and demand, decision-making, demonstration and poster making, and essay writing. By completing these projects students are able to learn life lessons and are rewarded for their efforts with placement ribbons and an award ceremony at the end of the school year.
Rick Walters from Horace Mann addressed the board next. Walters is also a representative for donorschoose.com. This is a website that allows teachers to post projects, activities, supplies, etc. that need funding.  Individual donors, as well as businesses, can then choose which projects they would like to fund. Walters told the board that Johnson County Schools has had over $200,000 donated to complete these projects, with Roan Creek Elementary (RCE) receiving the most donations with over $50,000; RCE has also had more projects funded than any other school in the state of Tennessee.
Marly Eggers, student school board member, reported to the board that the seniors would have local Scholarship Day on February 10. She also reported that there are now four televisions in the commons area that show an ACT practice question, the lunch menu, weather, and announcements. According to Eggers, the Health Occupation Student Association team went to the regional competition and several students will be moving on to state. Abby Smith, junior at JCHS, was chosen to attend the 2017 Tennessee Governor’s School for Scientific Models and Data Analysis.
Eggers also updated the board about the upcoming schedule for boys and girls basketball tournaments and announced that the boys junior varsity team “won their conference championship game for the second year in a row.” Next up for JCHS sports will be softball and baseball, with practices beginning the week of February 14, followed by tennis and track and field.
For the rest of the story, pick up a copy of this week’s Tomahawk.