Johnson County Community Foundation awards $47,875 in grants

By Rebecca Herman

Since 1999, the Johnson County Community Foundation has been able to gift over $4.3 million to students, teachers, organizations, and community partners. What began as one scholarship fund has grown into four that raise money throughout the year in the hopes of enhancing Johnson County and the lives of community members. Funds have been raised by The Johnson County Growth Fund, Johnson County Endowment, Johnson County Scholarship Fund, and the Margaret M. Wachs Youth Leadership Fund.
On Monday, July 17 a reception was held at the Johnson County library to honor the recipients of this year’s scholarships and grants. The first recipients honored were students who received the Johnson County Educational Growth Scholarship. These students will receive $1,000 for up to two years: Caleb Arnett, Carlyn Eggers, Patti Kay Furches, Brianne Ward, and Montana Woodard. The Johnson County Scholarship was also awarded; this scholarship provides $8,000 for up to four years. The recipients for this scholarship were Tyler Berry, Arizona Woodard, and Nevada Woodard.
The following grants were awarded to teachers, organizations, and community partners:
Appalachian Service Project: Johnson County Home Repair Incentive
The Barter Foundation: Performance of “Twas the Night Before Christmas” by Barter Players on November 11, 2017
Dry Run Volunteer Fire Department: FLIR K33 Thermal Imaging Camera Kit
East Tennessee Spay & Neuter: Boo Boo Fund, which helps local low-income families with spay-neuter surgery and basic and urgent veterinary care costs
Friends of Johnson County Library: The Start of Something Big, which will bring Illustrator Michael P. White to Mountain City for a three day hands-on interactive writing and illustrating workshop with Johnson County school children
Heritage Hall Inc.: Barter Theatre: “Call of the Wild” and “Aesop’s Fables” for two daytime performances and one evening performance of “Aesop’s Fables”
Johnson County JAM: add a monthly workshop and repair and purchase new instruments to loan out to students
Long Journey Home: expanding event to four days. Event will take place Labor Day weekend, Thursday to Sunday and will include square dancing, dinner, busking on Main Street, live musical heritage homecoming tour, unveiling of art mural, art show, quilt show, and Sunday Singing.
Johnson County Center for the Arts: Shelving and displays for new building
Johnson County Farmer’s Market: Promotion and Expansion of FRE$H Savings matched SNAP dollars at Johnson County Farmers Market
Johnson County High School FFA: Reaching New Heights: purchase two drones to allow students to learn flight operations and gather and analyze data retrieved from drones
Johnson County High School Volleyball: volleyball camp, help complete uniform set, purchase short-sleeved jerseys, and get a roster board
Johnson County High School Latin Club: help with costs to attend the TJCL Latin Convention for competition in April 2018
Johnson County High School SkillsUSA: travel and competition costs for SkillsUSA to Chattanooga, TN and possibly Louisville, KY.
Johnson County Humane Society Inc.: assist low-income households with the cost to spay-neuter their cats and/or dogs
Johnson County Middle School Robotics Team: help with cost to buy parts for new robots for competition and competition fees
Johnson County School System: HOSA International Competition
Johnson County Senior Citizens Center: purchasing new furniture to create a more comfortable setting in order to improve socialization
Pregnancy Support Center of Johnson County: Healthy Beginnings Prenatal/ Infant Care Educational Incentive Program
Second Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Tennessee: Food For Kids Back Pack Program
The First Tee of Tri-Cities: teach golf and life skills to students during physical education classes
UT/TSU Extension-Johnson County 4-H: funds would provide students to attend 4-H camp and conferences at a reduced cost.
This year the Johnson County Community Foundation along with the Wachs Youth Leadership Fund was able to award $47, 875.

Major Event Training for Churches/Houses of Worship

Major Event Training for Churches/Houses of Worship

A major event training for churches and houses of worship will be held on Tuesday, July 25, 2017at 6:00 PM the Fellowship Hall of First Christian Church located at 401 West Main Street Mountain City, TN 37683. Recently, the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office sent out notifications to all churches/houses of worship, notifying the leadership that the FBI has offered a major event training, free of charge. Please let us know if you were not contacted, as every effort was made to include everyone, however a lot of notifications were returned.

Below is the date, time and place of the training. Also here is a reminder of what the training will cover: Active shooter,

Forming a collaborative plan, Understanding the situation, Determining goals and objectives, Plan Development, Plan preparation, review and approval, Plan implementation and maintenance. Again we ask that if your church/house of worship has not been contacted, please let us know. We certainly tried to contact everyone and had no intentions of leaving anyone out and hope we did not do so. 423-727-7761.

 

Adult Education (GED) Classes Starting August 1st, 2017

Adult Education (GED) Classes Starting August 1st, 2017

Call (423)460-3330 or drop by the all-new Johnson County/Mountain City Adult Education Classrooms TODAY- located at 372 Cold Springs Road

(Side entrance of the Department of Human & Child Services Building)

Starting August 1st, classes will be held four (4) days a week, AND we have Night Classes to accommodate our working adults!

Some students are able to earn their diplomas’ in less than a month!

Classes are FREE and HiSet (GED) Testing is FREE!

Take that first step towards changing your life TODAY!

 

Coach Harold Arnold’s memory will live on forever

Coach Harold Arnold relaxing on a Sunday afternoon

By Tim Chambers

You can’t say Johnson County High School without saying Coach Harold Arnold. Coach went to paradise on Monday, July 10, 2017 after 90 years on this earth.
Coach Arnold was an icon to all those who knew him. He was a loyal member of First Christian Church and served our country in WWII as a member of the U.S. Navy.
It would take a scroll to list all the organizations that he belonged to that included playing football at Lees-McRae and ETSU.

He leaves behind a daughter, Donna, and a son, Steve, plus a vast number of friends that included legendary hall of fame referee, Ralph Stout, and hall of fame coach, Charlie Bayless of Happy Valley.
He spoke highly of the duo on the day that I interviewed him in addition to Joe Atwood just two years ago.
I’ll never forget the day that he kindly welcomed me into his home.  It was so easy to find. The Longhorn emblem on his mailbox stood out.
We sat on the front porch on a breezy Sunday afternoon. Several people were walking the street that he lived on including high school Principal Lisa Throop and director of schools Mischelle Simcox.
He greeted them with a wave and asked how each was doing.
Then we went on with our interview.
I learned that he was a standout three-sport athlete and later played football at East Tennessee State College.

I was fascinated to know that he joined the Navy while in high school.  He spent two years in the South Pacific and would later come home and earn his high school diploma.
He became Johnson County’s high school football coach in 1952. Sixty-five years later he would be laid to rest in a county where he was greatly respected and loved.
I had never met this man nor had I ever talked to him, yet he made me feel special upon our inaugural meeting. He was very proud of his 1958 football team and a couple more in the mid 60’s.
We talked about our Lord and about loving and caring. I realized the man was a saint after telling me a story that I’ve never forgotten.
“The 1958 season wouldn’t have been as special had it not been for the boys from Shady Valley,” said Arnold. “They sacrificed a lot to play.

Seven boys from Shady were members of the team. Six of them were starters. Arnold and his wife, Maxine, made sure they were taken care of.
He drove them home on the bus every day after ball practice. He and his wife would board them on Friday nights after the game. Each one got a hot breakfast on Saturday before Coach took them home.
“They didn’t have a way home and sometimes it was late,” said Arnold. “So Maxine and I let them spend the night at our house. She would cook for them and make sure they all were taken care of. She loved those boys and they loved her. I think they loved her cooking more than anything.”
Coach had a motto. “Be good to kids and they’ll be good to you.” He never worried when they were at his place.
Arnold loved the outdoors and he loved to work. He had canned green beans, apples and tomatoes the day before I met him.
I sometimes use one of his stories that he told me when preaching.
Arnold reminded me that Monday through Thursday were his work days. Fridays and Saturdays were his relaxation days and Sunday was the Lord’s day.

The four-day workweek sounded good but I liked even better that Sunday was a sacred day for him.
You would need the world’s largest tape measure to size up what this man meant to Johnson County.
The football field named in his honor will always be a reminder of what a great teacher and coach he was at JCHS.
But his memory will live on forever.

Tarrs honored at graduation as long-time supporters of Imagination Library

Imagination Library t-shirt design contest winners are (left to right): 1st place – Liam Crawford, 2nd place – Wyatt Worley,  and 3rd place – Anna Jones

By Conner Nowak

The Imagination Library is an effort started by Dolly Parton to put high quality books in the hands of younger children every month with the goal of engaging them into literature at an early age. Children participating in the program receive the gift of a specially selected book each month.
Since starting in 1995, the program has become available in over 1,600 communities, including Johnson County. Johnson County Imagination Library was recently recognized with a three-star award for having 75 percent of Johnson County students under five receiving books. The state average is 68 percent. The Imagination Board appreciates the support it received from the community which made this achievement possible.
The success of this local program is due largely to the ongoing support of the community and key community financial partners such as Dr. Donald Tarr and his wife Carol. The couple supported the Imagination Library program when it began here in the county 13 years ago and have continued to support it throughout the years.
Dr. Tarr and his wife were honored at a graduation party which was held at the local library for children who have been a part of the program that will be attending kindergarten in the fall. The children received an Imagination Library backpack with school supplies and a book with a label inside honoring the Tarrs.
Also recognized at the graduation were three children who won the Johnson County Imagination Library t-shirt design contest, Liam Crawford (first place), Wyatt Worley (2nd place), and Anna Jones (3rd place). The students were tasked with designing a shirt for the Imagination Library with a theme that reflected books and/or reading. To say the students delivered would be an understatement.
Those invested in the program believe that kids can be given a creative spark and develop their imaginations by entering the world of reading. Literacy can be a valuable trait to have and there are a number of statistics out there showing that programs such as the Imagination Library do dramatically improve scores during early literacy testing.
Programs such as the Imagination Library serve an important role in communities as they not only stimulate the imaginations of children, they also encourage creativity through events such as the aforementioned t-shirt contest.
Parents with children under the age of five who wish to register their child into the Imagination Library program can do so on their website. The program is open to anyone under the age of five regardless of financial circumstance.

 

 

‘Farm at Green Gables’ joins the Quilt Trail

Blaine and Anita Smith hold a quilt made by hergrandmother as they stand in front of their barn quilt square hand painted by Anita.

Meet Johnson County residents Blaine and Anita Smith, who purchased a farm on Dug Hill Road in 2012.  Compared to their years living in Charlotte, says Anita Smith, “the slower pace of life in Johnson County has a way of drawing you in.”
But the Smiths soon found out that farm life is hardly ever slow can be busier than ever before.
The Smiths started their self-described “micro-farm”, called The Farm at Green Gables, and have participated as a vendor selling eggs at the Johnson County Farmers Market. “We are producing our own garden vegetables, eggs, hay and raising six American Dairy Goat Association registered Nigerian Dwarf dairy goats, which require milking twice a day,” says Anita.
Blaine was raised in Michigan farming country, but he and Anita learned from many sources while they were starting their farm, including the Field School beginning farmer training program offered annually by the Appalachian RC&D Council (see www.arcd.org; courses begin again November 2017 and run through August 2018). According to Blaine, “we owe so much of this to the Field School and what we learned. We would have never known about resources and programs that have helped us.”
Johnson County is home to 13 quilt barns (see www.quilttrail.org) and when Anita discovered the Quilt Trail she knew she wanted the farm to join.
She attended the annual July Quilt Turning that the Quilt Trail organizers and volunteers hold at Farmhouse Gallery and Gardens in Unicoi. Seeing the antique quilts and hearing their stories told, got her inspired.
She decided that she would paint the quilt block herself as a tribute to her paternal grandmother, Lucretia (Creeta) Stepp Curtis.
“I own a hand-stitched quilt made by her, of the simple Crossroads pattern. Granny, as we all called her, was a very simple, frugal woman but a woman of great substance.  She and my Papaw, Oval Curtis, raised six children in the southern Appalachian mountains of Logan County West Virginia.  I have wonderful memories of their home always being a welcoming place with the smell of wholesome food cooking and plenty of storytelling by Papaw as we would sit in the swing with him.”
Anita also painted a second quilt board on the barn, of her own design, inspired by farm life. The barn is visible from Dug Hill Road.
The Farm at Green Gables is a new name for an older settlement, as evidenced by a small cemetery for the Minks Family , shaded under thick trees on the property with markers from 1921 to 1960, according to the Smiths.  Found in a cottage on the property was an old box of letters from the family that contained interesting stories of days gone by. The Smiths continue to seek more information about the Minks family. If anyone has information to share, please email: anita77@centurylink.net.
The 3rd annual Quilt Turning to benefit the Quilt Trail is Wednesday July 19th at 12:00pm at Farmhouse Gallery and Gardens, Unicoi. The event features  more than a dozen rare antique quilts and storytellers telling about history, family, faith, through the lens of these family heirlooms. Information and ticket sales at www.arcd.org or by calling 423-979-2581.

Rainbow Mennonite kids’ outing this Saturday

God’s Backwoods Disciples Ministry and Rainbow Mennonite Church will be having their 14th annual outing. The event will be held this Saturday, July 22nd at the Forge Creek Community Center (old Forge School) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Some of this year’s activities will be trout fishing in the creek behind the community center, hunting and fishing simulators, archery, BB and pellet target shooting, as well as other stations. There will be door prizes and free food.

Rainbow Mennonite invites all children in Johnson County and surrounding areas to join us for a great family outing. Enjoy fun and fellowship as we learn about Jesus and God’s great outdoors.

For more info, call 727-6230 or 433-7375.

Johnson County Community Hospital hosts blood drive in honor of Hunter Lundy

MOUNTAIN CITY, Tenn.  – Johnson County Community Hospital will host a blood drive with nonprofit regional blood center, Blood Assurance, in honor of Hunter Lundy. The blood drive will take place on July 26 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at Johnson County Community Hospital on 1901 South Shady St.

“Johnson County Community Hospital is honored to join with the Lundy family and host this blood drive in memory of Hunter Lundy,” said Chastity Trivette, assistant administrator and director of ancillary services for Johnson County Community Hospital. “Blood drives with Blood Assurance are our only source of blood products needed to be prepared in the event of emergencies and also to maintain the health of our citizens who need regular transfusions to live. We encourage everyone who can come to donate in honor of Hunter.”

The blood drive will feature Hunter’s favorite snacks and keepsakes for all donors. Additionally, all donors will receive the “Heart of a Hero” T-shirt, donors 18 years or older will be entered into a drawing to win a grill and donors 18 years or older will be entered into a drawing to win the “Pick Your Paradise” vacation getaway.

For more information about this blood drive or to schedule an appointment, visit www.bloodassurance.org/hunter or contact Sadie Lundy at 423-302-8122.

 About Blood Assurance

Blood Assurance is a nonprofit, full-service regional blood center serving 51 counties and more than 76 health care facilities in Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina and Virginia. Founded in 1972 as a joint effort of the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Medical Society, the Chattanooga Area Hospital Council and the Chattanooga Jaycees, the mission of Blood Assurance is to provide a safe and adequate supply of blood and blood components to every area patient in need. Blood Assurance is based in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Benefit dinner for Linda and Jimmy Price

Benefit Dinner for Linda and Jimmy Price who lost their home and all of their belongings in a fire, on Saturday July 22, from 4-8 at the Riverview Community Center in Creston NC. We will be having a pinto bean supper along with the fixings. We also will be having some great Gospel singing, a cake auction, a silent auction, and a raffle for a corn hole board. For questions please contact Anthony Roark at 336-385-6506.

Johnson County Hikers Club headed to Crabtree Falls

The Johnson County Hikers Club is open to everyone. You do not have to be highly experienced though the ability to hike the length of the trail is essential. Beginners and supervised children are welcome. We will meet in the parking lot of the Food Lion in Mountain City on the Hwy 421 end. We meet at 8:45 a.m. and leave at 9:00 a.m. sharp unless otherwise stated. We carpool from there to hike sites. Bring a walking stick, lunch, plenty of water and sunscreen. A hat often comes in handy, too. All hikes are on Saturday unless otherwise stated. Because of weather conditions or unexpected events, we may need to substitute our stated destination for something more fitting to the day. If you have questions, call Carol at 727-5947 or check us out on Facebook.

July 22nd – Today we will leave at 8 (meet at 7:45) for our hike to the Falls of Little Stoney. This is a wondrous walk in the woods along a picture perfect creek. Truly a “hidden” treasure since the “road” to the trailhead is rough and about five miles long. The walk itself is about five miles and can involve some challenging footing as most creek walks do. But this is a beautiful hike and well worth the trouble. Come and join us on this lovely adventure into the woods.

 

Johnson County, Tennessee historical lectures

The Johnson County Historical Society, which is celebrating its 40th year of serving the citizens of our community, is pleased to announce its 2017 Program of Lectures and Special Events. The lectures will be held at the Johnson County Welcome Center (716 S Shady St., Mountain City, Tennessee 37683) on the third Sunday of each month, at 2:00 pm, beginning Sunday, May 21 2017.

The monthly lecture topics have been selected to appeal to both new-comers to the area and those whose family has lived in the county for many generations; to the young and the old; to those with a passion for history, and those who are simply curious about the historical legacy of those who have come before them into this rugged but beautiful section of the southern Appalachian Mountains.

July 16: Long Journey Home: The Musical Heritage of Johnson County

August 20: The Historical Society’s Annual Picnic (no lecture – details to be announced separately)

September 17: The Watauga Purchase of 1736: The Origin of today’s Deeds of Trust

October 15: Before the White Man Came: The History of Native Americans in Johnson County

November 19: Tracing Your Family Tree: Genealogical Resources Available in Johnson County

Attendance at these events is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. Johnson County schoolteachers and their students are encouraged to attend. Those interested in joining the Historical Society may do so at any of these events. Annual dues are just $7.00 for singles; $10 for couples.

Comments or questions regarding this program may be referred to Bob Morrison, President, Johnson County Historical Society, through the Welcome Center at (423) 727 5800.

Special performance by Music City Drum Corp at Johnson County High School

Tuesday, July 18th @ 7 PM

JOHNSON COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

FOOTBALL STADIUM

Special performance by Music City Drum Corp

Join us for fun, music, and food with this nationally recognized mega-marching band! Admission is free to the public! Concessions will be opened by the Johnson County Band Boosters. We will be serving hot dogs, hamburgers, nachos, and more! We hope to see you there!

Presented by the Johnson County High School Band Boosters

Be a part of The Tomahawk’s salute to our emergency personnel on July 26th

The Tomahawk will present a special salute to our first responders in our community in our July 26th edition.
Not only will we run profiles of our local police and emergency personnel, but we will also offer tips on preparing yourself, your family and your home for unexpected emergencies. It will be full of important resources you won’t want to miss.
In addition, you will also be able to send a personal message to a hero in your life, whether they are on the police force, work for the sheriff’s department or are a first responder. Individual tributes will be available for $10 and will include a photo, name and a message from you. It’s a wonderful way to thank those who have made a difference in your life.

Advertising opportunities are available and all ads appear in The Tomahawk and on our Facebook page. The deadline to take part in this special edition is Friday, July 21st.
Contact Rita Hewett, the advertising manager, for more information on ad sizes and pricing. She can be reached at 423-727-6121 x 22 or on her cell at 423-727-0664. Her email is adsales@thetomahawk.com.

Senior Center’s coloring group presents their art to Mountain City Care Center residents

The adult coloring group at the Johnson County Senior Center has been busy making beautifully colored pictures. Several members recently traveled to the Mountain City Care and Rebab Center and visited each room to give each resident a picture they had colored. The activity was enjoyed by both groups. In fact, it was so rewarding they have already begun coloring to take another trip to visit the residents.

There is always a place at the coloring table for women and men who want to enjoy the art. Come into the center and pick up a calendar of events and daily menu. There are many activities going on daily but you just may find yourself at the adult coloring table.

Johnson County Bank a generous supporter of the Johnson County Center for the Arts

Bonnie Reece, Vice-President of Johnson County Bank presents a donation of $5,000 to the Johnson County Arts Council for the new Center for the Arts. Pictured are Cristy Dunn, Executive Director of the Center for the Arts; Evelyn Cook, Center for the Arts Board; Bonnie Reece; Nancy Garrick, Arts Council President; and Temple Reece, Center for the Arts Financial Director.
JCB has been a long time supporter of the Arts in Johnson County. Long Journey Home, the Mural Project, JAM, Magic of Christmas in a Small Mountain Town, art displays at the bank, juried shows, children’s programs and so many other projects within the Arts Council have been made better because of their support and encouragement.
The Center for the Arts is scheduled to open the weekend of Long Journey Home (Labor Day weekend).

Benefit dinner for Linda and Jimmy Price

Benefit Dinner for Linda and Jimmy Price who lost their home and all of their belongings in a fire, on Saturday July 22, from 4-8 at the Riverview Community Center in Creston NC. We will be having a pinto bean supper along with the fixings. We also will be having some great Gospel singing, a cake auction, a silent auction, and a raffle for a corn hole board. For questions please contact Anthony Roark at 336-385-6506.

Major Event Training for Churches/Houses of Worship

Major Event Training for Churches/Houses of Worship

A major event training for churches and houses of worship will be held on Tuesday, July 25, 2017at 6:00 PM the Fellowship Hall of First Christian Church located at 401 West Main Street Mountain City, TN 37683. Recently, the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office sent out notifications to all churches/houses of worship, notifying the leadership that the FBI has offered a major event training, free of charge. Please let us know if you were not contacted, as every effort was made to include everyone, however a lot of notifications were returned.

Below is the date, time and place of the training. Also here is a reminder of what the training will cover: Active shooter,

Forming a collaborative plan, Understanding the situation, Determining goals and objectives, Plan Development, Plan preparation, review and approval, Plan implementation and maintenance. Again we ask that if your church/house of worship has not been contacted, please let us know. We certainly tried to contact everyone and had no intentions of leaving anyone out and hope we did not do so. 423-727-7761.