Quilt Guild meeting Jan. 21

Quilt Guild meeting Jan. 21
Start the new year off by joining us at the Tennessee Sunrise Quilt Guild. We meet on Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 10:00AM in the fellowship hall of First Christian Church. If you would like to learn how to quilt or are a seasoned quilter – we welcome all. We are starting a new year with new officers, new ideas, new projects, join the fun

Roan Creek Baptist Church has medical equipment for those in need

Roan Creek Baptist Church has medical equipment for those in need

East Tennessee Medical Mission at Roan Creek Baptist Church has medical equipment for those in need. This is a free service. If you are in need of medical equipment please call Roan Creek Baptist Church on Monday, Wednesday or Friday between the hours of 8:00 am and 12 noon at 423-727-7061. If there is no answer, you can call Hugh Slemp 423-480-0167, Tom Nelson 423-727-7589, Joe Barry 423-727-7837 or contact Roy Hodge 423-895-3507. We also take used medical equipment. If you want to donate equipment to our church please call any of the numbers listed above.

 

PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE

PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE

TOWN OF MOUNTAIN CITY

COMMERCIAL FAÇADE GRANT PROGRAM

 

A Public Meeting has been scheduled to provide details of the Commercial Façade Grant Building Improvement Program. The funds are provided by the State of Tennessee. The meeting will be held at the Town of Mountain City at 210 S. Church Street on Thursday, February 9 at 6:00 p.m. Building owners, their representatives, and any interested parties will be provided applications and program guidelines. All persons of any race, age, or gender are welcome to attend. Any person wishing to attend with special needs of accessibility should contact the Town at (423) 727-8005.

 

The boundary of improvement district includes U.S. Highway 421 to the West, College St. and Butler Lane to the North, Depot St. and Furnace Creek to the East, and Donnelly St. and Mary St. to the South.

Valentine banquet to benefit Steve Roman

SONshine and Reign Ministries will be having a Valentine banquet for couples on February 11th from 5 to 7 p.m. Funds from the event will benefit Steve Roman who is in need of a medical procedure not covered by insurance. The dinner will be held at Nelson’s Chapel located just off Forge Creek Road. Local bluegrass gospel music will perform during the dinner. More details including the menu, cost, and entertainment will be announced soon. Call 423-727-6230 for more information.

 

New security measures to be implemented at Johnson County courthouse

By Paula Walter

The Johnson County Courthouse Security Committee is in the process of making changes to the courthouse that will increase security measures.  The committee is made up of Sheriff Mike Reece, Chancellor John Rambo, Clerk and Master Sherrie Fenner, Mayor Larry Potter, and District Attorney General Tony Clark, or a representative from his office. Tennessee law states each county will form a security committee in order to determine the security needs of the courtrooms in the county in order to provide a safe and secure facility.
Representatives from the Peace Officers Standards Training Commission (POST) office in Nashville went through the courtroom and every office in the building checking for safety issues.  After the inspection, the committee was advised that new security measures needed to be put in place.
According to Sheriff Reece, POST informed the committee that the courthouse was very insecure and recommended changes be made to the building so there will only be one entrance. There will also be changes to the courtroom where the witnesses will no longer be sitting in close proximity to the jury for security reasons.  Locks on doors throughout the courthouse will be changed and will be keyless. “We are living in different times and security is a big issue,” said Reece.
According to Reece, the main entrance to the courthouse will be in the back of the building.  There will be a metal detector near the main entrance, as well as another new unit for the upper courtroom. A part-time person will need to be hired to man the entrance.  There will be several exit only doors.
According to Reece, the new detector, although very sensitive, will not pick up jewelry, implants or pacemakers.  However, it will pick up weapons or cell phones that may be hidden inside someone’s body.  “There are no cell phones allowed in the court room and no recording devices unless the judge okays it,” said Reece.
For the rest of the story, pick up a copy of this week’s Tomahawk.

‘Claybank’ music is on the rise with band up for six bluegrass awards and a song going to #2 on charts

claybankBy Marlana Ward

Hailing from the mountains and valleys of Western North Carolina and Northeastern Tennessee, a local music group is taking their musical heritage to the masses.  Claybank, a bluegrass band based out of West Jefferson, North Carolina, has been drawing the attention of Nashville recording studios and bluegrass enthusiasts alike with their lively performances of traditional-style bluegrass music.
In January 2015, four men with a passion for bluegrass instruments and fun came together to found Claybank.  The band chose its name because they do the majority of their practice and music development in the Claybank community of Ashe County.  Band members include North Carolinians Gary Trivette, Jacob Greer, Zack Arnold, and Mountain City resident, Tyler Thompson.
Thompson’s love of bluegrass began at a young age.  “I have always loved bluegrass,” Thompson remembered.  “As a small kid, when we were in the car I used to ask my parents to ‘put Doyle Lawson on the radio’ all the time. My dad had a Smoky Mountain hymns videocassette that I used to watch all the time because I loved the music so much. I heard a cassette of Southern Accent, a local band that Gary was in when I was 10 years old and that’s when I decided I wanted to play bluegrass.”
As a young man Thompson began to feel his passion for bluegrass starting to wane and went to pursue other endeavors.  “When I joined the Army Reserve at 18, I was at a point where I was actually kind of tired of music. I had spent all my teenage years doing nothing but playing in bands, contests, and things like that,” Thompson recalled. “I had big dreams like any kid would and wanted to do it professionally, but some discouraging setbacks had me ready to hang it up and spend my time doing something else. I went to basic training and then to San Antonio, Texas for several months and hardly even thought about bluegrass. I didn’t even pick up an instrument once for nearly a year, until I came back home and started working again. Gary called me in February of 2012 and asked me to play guitar for Carolina Crossing, and that rekindled my love of playing.”
With the formation of Claybank in 2015, the four men from the Appalachian Mountains have been able to take their love for their musical heritage to far beyond the hollers and hills that surround them.  “We have played some small concerts for about 50 people and we have played some festivals to crowds of about 1,500,” said Thompson.  “We have some shows coming up this year that may be some of the biggest we’ve ever played!”
Their entrance into the bluegrass community has not gone unnoticed.  Recently, the band has had doors opened to them with a recording contract that could take their music even further than they could have dreamed.  “It was almost surreal to a bunch of guys that initially planned to do no more than just play some local gigs on the weekends,” Thompson shared.  “We met Andrea Roberts, who took us in, mentored us and became our manager. We then met with Sam Passamano and Steve Gulley at Rural Rhythm Records and they agreed to sign us. Since then we’ve been able to see our first single on the bluegrass charts as high as number two, our album debuted at number eight on the Billboard Bluegrass chart, and we are currently nominated for six Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass Music of America (SPBGMA), including Album of the Year and Song of the Year.”
For the rest of the story, pick up a copy of this week’s Tomahawk.

Property tax assistance available for qualifying homeowners

By Paula Walter

Johnson County property taxes are due by February 28, 2017.  For those who struggle to pay, there are tax relief programs in place that may offer some assistance that could assist the elderly, along with disabled homeowners, disabled veteran homeowners and the widow or widower of disabled veteran homeowners.  The programs stipulate that those applying for assistance must live in their home year round.
In order to be eligible for assistance, there are eligibility requirements for each category.  For an elderly homeowner to receive assistance, they must be 65 by December 31, 2016 and provide proof of age if they do not draw social security.  They must own their own home and it is their primary residence.  The maximum income for the applicant, spouse and any other owners of the property is $29,180.  The maximum market value on the property on which the tax relief is calculated is $23,500.  They do not have to be disabled or partially disabled.  If your residence is a mobile home, you must present a copy of your title or bill of sale.
There is no age requirement for disabled homeowners to apply for assistance.  They must own their home and it must be their primary residence. Again, you must provide proof of age if the disability is not through social security.  The maximum income for the applicant, along with their spouse and any owners of the property is $29,180, and the maximum market value of the property on which the tax relief is calculated is also $23,500.  The homeowner must be considered totally and permanently disabled. Again, if your residence is a mobile home, you must present a copy of your title or bill of sale.
There is no age requirement for assistance for veteran homeowners who have a 100 percent disability that was determined by the Veterans Administration.  Again, they must use their home as their primary residence and reside there year round.  There is no maximum income to consider, and the market value on the property that their taxes are calculated on is $100,000.  They must be considered totally and permanently disabled and have been rated totally and permanently disabled by the Social Security Administration by the last day of December 2016. As stated before, if your residence is a mobile home, you must present a copy of your title or bill of sale.
A widow or widower of a disabled veteran does not have an age requirement for assistance, their home must be their residence year round, and there is no maximum income level and the max value on the home is $100,000.  They do not need to be disabled to receive assistance. Property tax relief can be given to the spouse of a disabled veteran if the veteran was eligible at their time of death for tax relief assistance, if their death was the result of a service or combat related cause or if they were killed in action. The surviving spouse will need a copy of the death certificate and a form of identification for yourself such as a driver’s license or social security card.  The surviving spouse must have been married to the veteran at the time of their death.
Annual income used to determine eligibility includes monies from Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, retirement or pension plans, Veterans’ Administration benefits, workers compensations, salary, interest or dividends, along with any other income sources.
If you have any questions about the program or to determine your eligibility for assistance, contact the Johnson County Trustee’s office at 423-727-9062 for more information.

Shady Valley Elementary recognized at school board meeting

By Bonnie Guy

The January session of the Johnson County School Board came to order with all board members in attendance. Shady Valley Elementary School was on the agenda to honor their most improved students. In addition, on behalf of the staff, students, and Shady Valley Elementary School Principal, Dana Smith, Kitty Peters was honored for her hard work and dedication.
“Kitty Peters is vital to the success of Shady Valley Elementary. She takes care of everything from taking a student’s temperature to breaking in a rookie principal,” said Principal Smith.
Smith added that Peters works tirelessly for the school and goes beyond her standard job duties with activities such as preparing for their auction, constructing Christmas program sets, as well as running the Santa’s Workshop.
“Without Kitty, we would be lost,” said Smith.
Students from several grades were also honored for showing the most improvement in their work. The honorees are Alley Ford in fifth grade from Heather Savery’s class, second grader Jaylen Main from Sandra McCloud’s class, fourth grader Kaitlyn James from Amy Lashlee’s class, and Josh Wallace from Gina Hodge’s pre-kindergarten class. The board expressed their congratulations to the students as well as a presenting them with a certificate.
Student board representative, Marley Eggers, gave her report to the board but not before she was wished a very happy 18th birthday by everyone. Eggers said the students started their second semester classes on January 3rd and report cards for the first semester were sent home on Friday, January 6th.  Although the school year is well into January, only two snow days had been used. Health Occupation Student Association, also known as HOSA, and Marsh Blood hosted a blood drive on Friday the 13th at the high school. Other events include a group of thespians from the drama department that are traveling to Thescon, the Tennessee thespian conference held at Middle Tennessee State University over the weekend.  This past Friday was also ACT night for all juniors and their parents. The goal is to help students prepare, register, and study for the ACT Test.
Dr. Steven Long presented the Johnson County Schools report card to the board.  Testing in grades three through eight was suspended last year after an overall improvement in scores and attendance had been seen. Scores from testing from grades nine through 12 over the past five years were compared and Johnson County has shown steady and substantial overall improvement. An example is the state average in Algebra I is 20.8, but Johnson County came in at 29.2, well above not only the state but all the surrounding counties as well. Improvement is still needed, especially in history and chemistry. However, with plans in place, scores in these areas should continue to improve.
For the rest of the story, pick up a copy of this week’s Tomahawk.

Valentine banquet to benefit Steve Roman

Valentine banquet to benefit Steve Roman
SONshine and Reign Ministries will be having a Valentine banquet for couples on February 11th from 5 to 7 p.m. Funds from the event will benefit Steve Roman who is in need of a medical procedure not covered by insurance. The dinner will be held at Nelson’s Chapel located just off Forge Creek Road. Local bluegrass gospel music will perform during the dinner. More details including the menu, cost, and entertainment will be announced soon. Call 423-727-6230 for more information

Cooking workshops will be held starting January 26

Cooking workshops
There will be a series of workshops dealing with cooking, food safety, nutrition, etc. starting January 26 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Johnson County Health Department Annex. Learn how to cook, save money on food, plan meals, eat well, keep your food safe and be active. Classes are free to adults who are eligible for any assistance program such as WIC, Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) or Head Start. Contact Sarah Ransom at 727-8161 or sransom@utk.edu.

Calvary Baptist Church opens clothes closet to the public

Calvary Baptist Church opens clothes closet to the public

Calvary Baptist Church now has a clothes closet ministry. It will be open to the public on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. If you are or know of anyone in need, please come visit us on Tuesday nights in our Life Center. They are located at

1324 Cold Springs Road in Mountain City.

Exercises That Can Help Fight Inflammation

Exercises That Can Help Fight Inflammation

When it comes to your overall health, one of the biggest threats is long-lasting inflammation. Inflammation, characterized by symptoms such as swelling, heat, and pain, has been linked to a host of diseases and ailments.

Fortunately, there are several ways to reduce inflammation. One of the easiest, proven tools for managing inflammation is exercise. In particular, certain exercises produce a marked reduction in inflammation.

What Is Inflammation?

Inflammation, part of the body’s immune response, occurs due to a variety of reasons but mainly due to the body’s attempt to protect itself whether by removing damaged cells or fighting pathogens. There are two types of inflammation:

Acute: Short-term inflammation usually lasting no longer than a few days to a few weeks
Chronic: Inflammation that lasts months or possibly even years

Side Effects of Chronic Inflammation

Although inflammation serves a crucial role in most cases, such as fighting off a cold, chronic inflammation can lead to multiple issues including rheumatoid arthritis, plaque build up in the arteries, and certain cancers. Whether your chronic inflammation is due to an autoimmune disease, poor diet, or other conditions, it is important to assist your body in lowering it.

Top Exercises to Consider for Reducing Inflammation

Almost any exercise can lead to an improvement in inflammation but choosing activities specifically linked to lower inflammation levels will be of the greatest benefit. Of course, it is important to check with your doctor before beginning any new exercise program. A few of the key exercise options to consider for reducing inflammation include:

HIIT: High Intensity Interval Training: Possibly the top exercise for reducing inflammation is HIIT – High Intensity Interval Training. Exercising using alternate periods of low and high intensity for short periods of time can help lower inflammation as well as lead to an increase in overall athletic performance.
Walking: Walking is a simple and often underrated form of exercise that offers many benefits. With no equipment necessary, walking is an easy exercise to implement into your regimen. Walking, especially outdoors, is a great way to lower stress and, as a result, lower inflammation.
Resistance Exercise: Any type of resistance exercise, when done properly, can lead to decreased inflammation.

All in all, reducing inflammation is possible with the appropriate exercises and lifestyle changes. By following the guidelines above, you will assist your body in lowering inflammation and increasing your health.

Beer Board meeting Tuesday, Jan. 17

Beer Board meeting Jan. 17
The Johnson County Beer Board will hold a meeting on January
17, 2017 at the Johnson County Courthouse, Lower Court
Room at 7 pm. The meeting is open to the public.
The meeting is open to the public

Calvary Baptist Church opens clothes closet to the public

Calvary Baptist Church opens clothes closet to the public

Calvary Baptist Church now has a clothes closet ministry. It will be open to the public on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. If you are or know of anyone in need, please come visit us on Tuesday nights in our Life Center. They are located at

1324 Cold Springs Road in Mountain City.

Representative Timothy Hill to hold town hall meeting

State Representative Timothy Hill will hold a town hall meeting at Lois’ Cafe at 6:00 Monday, January 23rd at 6:oo pm.  The restaurant is located at 542 W. Main Street in Mountain City.  All are invited to attend.  Join Timothy Hill as he discussed the upcoming legislative session and hears your concerns and takes questions.